Honouring Killean and Kilchenzie’s fallen 100 years on

Now: members of the community and relatives of the fallen servicemen gathered for last Saturday's rededication service.
Now: members of the community and relatives of the fallen servicemen gathered for last Saturday's rededication service.

Want to read more?

We value our content and access to our full site is only available on subscription. Your subscription entitles you to 7-day-a-week access to our website, plus a full digital copy of that week’s paper to read on your pc/mac or mobile device In addition your subscription includes access to digital archive copies from 2006 onwards.

Already a subscriber?

 

Problems logging in and require
technical support? Click here
Subscribe Now

Just as it did when Glenbarr War Memorial was unveiled a century ago, the weather cleared in time for the monument’s rededication service last weekend.

It was cloudy as members of the community gathered at the cenotaph last Saturday, 100 years and one day after the monument was first revealed, but the sun began to shine as soon as the service began at 3pm.

The rededication proceedings closely followed those of the unveiling ceremony which took place at 3pm on Saturday July 29 1922.

According to a Campbeltown Courier report from the time, it was a ‘remarkable’ gathering of people from all parts of the district.

Then: a 'remarkable' gathering of people from all parts of the district attended the 1922 unveiling.
Then: a ‘remarkable’ gathering of people from all parts of the district attended the 1922 unveiling.

The morning was showery but by the afternoon it had cleared and the solemn proceedings were carried out in pleasant weather conditions.

In 1922, the welcome and bible readings were carried out by Sergeant Edward MacDonald DCM (late 8th The Argyllshire Battalion), Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who released the Union Flag which unveiled the slab containing the names of those who died in WWI; a slab with the names of those who died in WWII was added and unveiled on November 7 1954.

At the rededication service, the welcome and same bible readings – 2 Samuel 1 v22-27 and Revelations 7 v13-17 – were carried out by Marion McDonald, war memorial trustee, who is great-grandniece-in-law of 2nd Engineer Duncan McDonald whose name appears on the monument.

War memorial trustee Marion McDonald welcomed people to the service.
War memorial trustee Marion McDonald welcomed people to the service.

In 1922, this was followed by an address by Cosmo Lang, the Archbishop of York.

His final words were: ‘Our brothers, we are proud of you, we shall not forget you: we pray to God that He will bless and keep you and give you His peace; and we pray to Him that we may be faithful to one another, to our country, to our God, as you were faithful unto death.’

Afterwards, the names of the fallen were read aloud by Mrs J R Macdonald of Largie, an act which was replicated by her great-granddaughter Victoria Maxwell-Macdonald on Saturday.

Victoria Maxwell-Macdonald read the names of the fallen during the rededication service, an act which was performed by her great-grandmother Mrs J R Macdonald of Largie at the unveiling ceremony.
Victoria Maxwell-Macdonald read the names of the fallen during the rededication service, an act which was performed by her great-grandmother Mrs J R Macdonald of Largie at the unveiling ceremony.

The Reverend Donald John MacDonald performed 1922’s prayer of dedication, while last Saturday’s prayer of rededication was performed by the Reverend Anne McIvor.

Reverend Anne McIvor.
Reverend Anne McIvor.

Before family members laid their wreaths at the foot of the memorial in 1922, the first wreath was placed by Mrs Archibald Galbraith, two of whose sons were included in the fallen. This was followed by a march past of ex-servicemen.

During the rededication service, a small group from Campbeltown Brass performed as the wreaths were placed.

Campbeltown Brass performed before and during the service.
Campbeltown Brass performed before and during the service.

The first, on behalf of Her Majesty the Queen, was placed by Kenneth MacNab MBE, Depute Lieutenant of Argyll and Bute; the second, on behalf of the war memorial trust, was placed by its chairman, Colour Sergeant Robbie Semple; and the third, on behalf of Argyll and Bute Council, was placed by Councillor Tommy Macpherson.

Councillor Tommy Macpherson laid a wreath on behalf of Argyll and Bute Council.
Councillor Tommy Macpherson laid a wreath on behalf of Argyll and Bute Council.

This was followed by floral tributes from family members of the fallen.

In line with the unveiling service, Reverend McIvor then offered the benediction before the national anthem was performed by Campbeltown Brass.

Afterwards, piper Calum O’Hanlon played the Flowers of the Forest, a duty performed by piper Findlay Fraser, 8th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, in 1922.

Piper Calum O'Hanlon.
Piper Calum O’Hanlon.

The following two-minute silence was broken by Katrina Barr of Campbeltown Brass, who played The Last Post on the cornet; this act was performed in 1922 by bugler Sergeant R MacSporran, 8th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Colour Sergeant Robbie Semple, chairman of Glenbarr War Memorial Trust.
Colour Sergeant Robbie Semple, chairman of Glenbarr War Memorial Trust.

Many of those involved in last Saturday’s centenary ceremony, from trust chairman Colour Sergeant Semple to the piper and members of the brass band are relatives of those named on the monument, whose memories were poignantly honoured.