From Our Files, June 10 2022

In 1952: Mr William Smith, Barrmains, is seen holding the Clydesdale trophy which he received from Mrs A Smith whose husband, Mr Andrew Smith, Drumore, was president of the Kintyre Agricultural Society and is seen on the extreme left of the picture.
In 1952: Mr William Smith, Barrmains, is seen holding the Clydesdale trophy which he received from Mrs A Smith whose husband, Mr Andrew Smith, Drumore, was president of the Kintyre Agricultural Society and is seen on the extreme left of the picture.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday June 8, 2012

Jubilee celebrations in Campbeltown

Campbeltown joined in with the celebrations for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.

A parade was organised for Saturday, with various groups marching down the town’s Main Street and along The Front to Quarry Green.

Music was provided by Machrihanish Dunes Sound of Kintyre Pipe Band and Campbeltown Brass.

There were a few stalls and a bouncy castle and later in the afternoon a tug of war competition took place.

Campbeltown Lifeboat Station opened its doors as well on Saturday with the fundraising committee serving up cream teas and members of the crew showing people around the boats.

Up and down the peninsula people celebrated with various events.

Café Bluebell served specially decorated cupcakes and staff dressed up for the occasion.

In 2012: Ten years ago it was the Golden Jubilee with Café Bluebell amongst those joining in the fun.
In 2012: Ten years ago it was the Golden Jubilee with Café Bluebell amongst those joining in the fun.

TWENTY FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday June 13, 1997

Lee is a Top Gun

A Campbeltown man came top of the class at the end of eight weeks of gruelling Royal Marine training.

Marine Engineering Mechanic Lee Nightingale, aged 28, completed his basic training at HMS Raleigh in Cornwall.

And at the passing out parade he received the Owen Cup for achieving the highest individual marks in the final examination during the eight weeks of training.

HMS Raleigh is the Royal Navy’s new entry training establishment at Torpoint in Cornwall.

All entries to the Royal Navy and Queen Alexandria’s Royal Naval Nursing Service undergo an intensive course in naval general training at Raleigh before going on to complete their specialist training.

Lee now hopes for a more challenging job with the opportunity to travel and has now moved onto HMS Dolphin in Hampshire, where he will complete his specialist submariner training.

In 1997: Marine Engineering Mechanic Lee Nightingale received his trophy from Commodore Hugh Rickard, the Commanding Officer of HMS Raleigh who took the salute at Lee’s passing out parade.
In 1997: Marine Engineering Mechanic Lee Nightingale received his trophy from Commodore Hugh Rickard, the Commanding Officer of HMS Raleigh who took the salute at Lee’s passing out parade.

KCR moves ahead

Kintyre Community Radio (KCR) hits the airwaves again next Friday for a summer season which, for the first time, features three full days of broadcasting each week.

And the station’s 1997 debut will come just one week after a spectacular sell-out fund-raising event in aid of meeting the costs of getting KCR on this season.

John Campbell and his fellow KCR workers, organisers and fundraisers are currently waiting with bated breath to hear if they are successful with a number of cash bids which could ultimately lead them to gaining a full-time licence and new premises.

In 1997: Jack Barrett and John Campbell at KCT.
In 1997: Jack Barrett and John Campbell at KCT.

On July 17, the Scottish Office and will announce if KCR is one of the lucky bidders for the Rural Challenge Budget which would allow the station to pay for building premises.

And the Scottish Office is a key-player in KCR’s hopes for funding, as funds from the Rural Challenge Budget would most likely lead to Volunteers in the Community cash from the National Lottery in August.

This in turn would give KCR a great chance of being the successful bidder if and when a full-time licence is issued for the area in October.

So far KCR has raised £63,000 with £20,000 each from Argyll and Bute Council and Argyll and the Islands Enterprise, along with £23,000 raised by the station’s dedicated fundraising committee chaired by Jack Barrett.

This summer’s broadcasting licence has cost the station £5,500 and tomorrow night’s Stars in their Eyes show in the Victoria Hall, much of which has been organised by Helen Gilchrist and is a sell-out, could raise about £2,000 of that sum.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday June 15, 1972

Argosy successfully launched – yard’s largest vessel

The biggest launching Campbeltown Shipyard has seen for many years was successfully accomplished on Monday.

The crowd of shipyard workers and guests, the visitors among them young children in the galleries above the slipway, were momentarily quiet.

The 011 stood rock still awaiting her moment.

Then firmly, clearly, Mrs Andrew Campbell said: ‘I name this ship Argosy. May God bless her and all who sail in her.’

The champagne bottle exploded against the bows and a flurry of white wine bubbles drifted over the nearest spectators.

Slowly, held in check by the hawsers, she glided down the slipway and like a curtsying girl into the waters of the lock.

The hour was 1.30pm; the cheers that went up celebrated a perfect launch exactly on time.

Three minutes later, this beautiful 30-foot round hulled steel boat was on her way under her own power to the quay on the other side of the loch.

The experts agreed on the power that was in her and that she answered her helm sweetly.

The Union Flag at her stern, the Lion Rampant of Scotland proudly above her bows; it was a truly Scottish occasion.

Amongst those there were successful, hard-headed skippers from the north-east from Lossiemouth and Buckie and their families and the men from Glasgow and Lossiemouth with various interests in the enterprise.

The men from the shipyard who built the Argosy are building a successor for Mr William Campbell, who was awarded the MBE in the birthday honours.

He was there and so was Mr George Murray who has ordered the third of the 80 footers.

It will take some weeks for the Argosy to be fitted out here in Campbeltown.

Then she will be Lossiemouth bound by way of the Caledonian Canal and Inverness.

At the luncheon following the launch, Mrs Andrew Campbell was presented with a commemorative silver salver by Mr JH Arbuthnott of Lithgows Ltd, managing director of the Campbeltown Shipyard.

In his speech, Mr Arbuthnott thanked the Provost and Town Council of Campbeltown for all the help in establishing the yard and particularly for providing houses for key workers.

‘Although,’ he added, ‘we had to bring very few of them in.’

‘We are quite certain,’ claimed Mr Arbuthnott, ‘that we can make something of the yard. If this level is kept up there can be no doubt about the future.’

Mr Andrew Campbell, in a conventionally brief skipper’s speech, gave thanks to Mr Lesley Howarth and the shipyard workers for all that had been done.

Amid laughter he said: ‘I was down last Thursday and didn’t see how it could be done in time. But it was.’

Mr Lesley Howarth said: ‘We have a certain amount of pride in what we have produced today.’

SEVENTY YEARS AGO
Thursday June 12, 1952

Tonrioch produce supreme at Kintyre Show

The Kintyre Agricultural Society’s 87th annual show, which took place in ideal weather in Upper Kintyre Park, Campbeltown, on Friday, was one of the few agricultural events to remain unaffected by the incidence of foot and mouth disease, and, in some quarters, there existed the doubt as to whether the directors had made a wise decision in holding the show at all.

The fear of disease, however, while obviously uppermost in the minds of many of the exhibitors, did not have any marked, or even perceptible, effect on the entry forward.

It was only a last-minute change of mind that induced Mr Thomas Young, Glencraigs, to bring the cream of his noted Ayrshire herd to the show yard – a decision which greatly enhanced the attractiveness of the show and the prestige of his herd, for Mr Young scooped the pool and took all three cattle trophies home to add to his sideboard collection; and one of these trophies will remain at Glencraigs permanently.

In 1952: Mr Thomas Young, Glencraigs, with one of his prize Ayrshires. Can any of our farming readers tell us when it became the norm for the cattle to have their horns cut?
In 1952: Mr Thomas Young, Glencraigs, with one of his prize Ayrshires. Can any of our farming readers tell us when it became the norm for the cattle to have their horns cut?

Although there was an annoying heavy shower in the early part of the forenoon, the sun broke through into an excellent June day and show conditions were at their best.

There was again a good turnout of Ayrshires and Clydesdales, the two predominating sections at the show; the two which attract the greatest public attention.

The show was very well supported by the public. Hundreds arrived in the two special steamers from the mainland and, as these did not depart until 5pm, the visitors were able to witness much of the judging and the parade of prize stock which followed the presentation of the trophies by Mrs Smith, wife of the president Mr Andrew Smith, Drumore Farm, which took place on the show field.