From our Files, May 6 2022

In 1997: The glory days of the Campbeltown-Ballycastle ferry route, when 50 jobs were created.
In 1997: The glory days of the Campbeltown-Ballycastle ferry route, when 50 jobs were created.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday May 4, 2012

Weekend flight hopes stall

Kintyre will not have weekend flights to Glasgow until at least 2013, even if there is a demand, the Courier has learned this week.

Under the Public Service Obligation (PSO) agreement, current operator Loganair cannot consider introducing flights until at least October next year.

The possibility of weekend flights to and from Campbeltown has been a hot topic over the last few years, with many businesses feeling the area would benefit greatly, as more visitors would be encouraged.

Roger Hage, director of service delivery for Loganair, said putting on weekend flights could be seen as operating on a commercial basis, saying: ‘If we were to do that, it would break the PSO which could then be revoked.’

There is strong local feeling that more flights would capitalise on weekend demand, especially golf breaks, potentially bringing more revenue to the area.

Currently, there are two flights a day to Glasgow from Monday to Friday.

A meeting of the Kintyre Initiative Working Group heard last week that aircraft were often full on Fridays, with the feeling a Saturday service could be a very busy route.

Mr Hage told the meeting Loganair cannot consider going outwith the PSO at the moment.

While confirming the status quo would remain until 2013, a statement from the Scottish Government suggested a revised PSO could include a Saturday service.

In 2012: Children from Drumlemble Primary School have been busy getting stuck into the garden at the school. Older pupils Kirsty Mauchline, Ruth Turner and Emma Smith were tidying up one of the planters when the Courier caught up with them. They have been learning all about gardening and have their very own Olympic garden for their school topic about the event, which boasts different coloured plants.
In 2012: Drumlemble Primary School pupils have been busy in the school garden. Kirsty Mauchline, Ruth Turner and Emma Smith were tidying up one of the planters when the Courier caught up with them. They have been learning about gardening and have their own Olympic garden for their school topic about the event, which boasts different coloured plants. NO_c18files01

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday May 2, 1997

New staff welcomed to AA line

Local people employed by the Argyll and Antrim Steam Packet company gathered at the Ardshiel Hotel in Campbeltown this week for a staff induction.

Attended by 50 people from Campbeltown and the surrounding area, they received briefings on customer service and the high standards required for all staff.

‘It was a highly successful day which achieved a number of things,’ said route manager John Burrows.

‘Our new staff had the opportunity to meet each other and develop initial working relationships. They also learned of the high levels of service which the Argyll and Antrim Steam Packet Company will expect.

‘We are delighted so many of our staff come from the local area,’ he added. ‘It illustrates the continued commitment the company has towards bringing benefits to Campbeltown and the new route.’

The start of the new ferry route and the fact so many people are being employed from the local area has been seen as a blessing for job prospects.

Campbeltown has suffered from a high number of unemployed during recent years due to a number of reasons, including the mothballing of RAF Machrihanish and a reduction in the distillery and shipbuilding industries.

Fifty new jobs being created in Campbeltown, even though they are initially to be seasonal, will bring a major boost to the area’s employment figures and the economy in general.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday May 4, 1972

Necklace finder rewarded

Mr Thomas McGrory, who found the cist containing the famous jade necklace at Kintyre Nurseries, has received a reward of £20 from the Queen and Lord Treasurer’s Remembrancer.

Several readers have let us know they are disappointed the necklace is not already on view in Campbeltown Museum.

It will be put on display as soon as arrangements have been made which are in accordance with the necessary security regulations.

Margaret makes May Queen

Miss Margaret MacKenzie was chosen as Campbeltown May Queen 1972 at a dance in the Victoria Hall on Friday.

Miss MacKenzie, of Ralston Road, Campbeltown, won the title from a short list of 10.

Runner-up was Mrs Copeland of 118 Ralston Road and in third place was Miss Isabel Soudan from Campbeltown.

The competition was organised by the local branch of the Labour Party.

Scouts Cubs and Guides

The last week has been a busy and varied one for Campbeltown Scouts.

On Sunday April 23, they paraded to Saint Kiaran’s Episcopal Church with the Cubs for a service in commemoration of their patron saint, St George.

In the afternoon, a bonfire was lit at Knockbay Farm with sausages and roast potatoes for everyone.

Friday night saw a most interesting visit to the police station.

On Saturday, together with the 5th Campbeltown Guides, they took part in the county Youth Quiz Finals.

Although neither the Guides nor the Scouts won, they all enjoyed themselves.

SEVENTY YEARS AGO
Thursday May 1, 1952

New general hospital for Islay proposed

The Board of Management for Campbeltown and District Hospitals will call a special meeting to discuss details of the proposed new general hospital for the island of Islay, tentatively estimated to cost in the region of £20,000, when the plan, at present being prepared by architects of the Western Hospital Board, reach them.

On Monday afternoon, nine members of the board discussed the project without commenting on the technicalities or details of the building.

The meeting, held in the Christian Institute, was presided over by ex-Provost A D McNair OBE, chairman, accompanied by Reverend John McIntyre; Mr A P McCrory; Mr John C Macleod, Port Ellen; Mr Colin Campbell; Reverend B B Blackwood; Mr Ian MacPhail; Mrs Kerr and Mrs Armour.

The chairman said the proposals were discussed fully.

In 1957: The property market 70 years ago: you could rent a flat with no bathroom and be thrown out for Glasgow Fair when their relatives came to visit; be a lodger with some good home cooking or buy a house from the Argyll Estate.
In 1957: The property market 70 years ago: you could rent a flat with no bathroom and be thrown out for the Glasgow Fair when their relatives came to visit; be a lodger with some good home cooking or buy a house from the Argyll Estate. NO_c18files03

New herring prices for summer season – housewives will not be affected

It was announced on Friday that new prices for herring for various uses had been agreed at a private meeting of the trade in Edinburgh on Thursday at which various sections of the industry and fisherman’s organisations were represented.

Mr A I B Stewart, secretary of the Clyde Fishermen’s Association, who attended the conference with the association chairman Mr Robert McGowan, Campbeltown, told a reporter the conference was presided over by Sir George Wilson, a member of the herring industry board.

Mr Stewart said the greatly increased, and increasing, costs of production facing herring fishermen were emphasised at the conference and the board supported the view of the fishermen that increased prices were required for practically all uses of herring,

However, Mr Stewart pointed out that the fishermen did not insist on an increased price for herring for the home market as they were most anxious to encourage the British housewife to use this valuable, nutritious and cheap food stuff without further adding to a rise in the cost of living.