From our Files, April 29 2022

In 1997: A Kintyre woman has taken the 'take your dog to work' theme a step further. Kathy Ramsden of Culfuar Farm, Tayinloan, has in fact been taking a lamb to work with her for the last couple of weeks. The lamb, which was a twin, needs feeding every three to four hours and the only hope it has of surviving is for Kathy to nurture it to health. Back on the farm, everyone is too busy to find the time to feed the lamb so frequently, so Kathy took up the challenge and became its surrogate mum. Knuckles, as Cathy has named the lamb, because of its knuckle-looking feet, has been doing well and he's gaining strength by the day as it goes to work. And where better for Kathy to work, but the Campbeltown office of the National Farmers' Union. Kathy, right, works at the NFU office as assistant to Morna Paterson, left, who just loves the office’s newest employee.
In 1997: A Kintyre woman has taken the 'take your dog to work' theme a step further. Kathy Ramsden of Culfuar Farm, Tayinloan, has in fact been taking a lamb to work with her for the last couple of weeks. The lamb, which was a twin, needs feeding every three to four hours and the only hope it has of surviving is for Kathy to nurture it to health. Back on the farm, everyone is too busy to find the time to feed the lamb so frequently, so Kathy took up the challenge and became its surrogate mum. Knuckles, as Cathy has named the lamb, because of its knuckle-looking feet, has been doing well and he's gaining strength by the day as it goes to work. And where better for Kathy to work, but the Campbeltown office of the National Farmers' Union. Kathy, right, works at the NFU office as assistant to Morna Paterson, left, who just loves the office’s newest employee.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday April 27, 2012

Ring and Ride and Red Cross transport services secured

Two lifeline services that allow elderly people to lead active and independent lives have this week been secured.

Campbeltown Ring and Ride and the British Red Cross transport service have received thousands of pounds from Argyll and Bute Council to offer transport to some of the most vulnerable members of the community.

The Ring and Ride on-demand bus service operated by West Coast Motors was awarded £18,864 to continue to help elderly and disabled people in the town attend appointments and services.

The Red Cross service, which goes to remote places and transports elderly and disabled people to medical appointments and to access other services, received £3,500 for the coming financial year.

Despite concerns last week that it was under threat and that funding was being slashed, the council said funding for the service had already been identified in the budget published in February.

Robert Colburn, Red Cross senior service manager for Argyll, said: ‘The Red Cross is acutely aware of how much this service means to people in Kintyre.

‘Many who use it have mobility problems, live in remote rural areas and either cannot use or would have extreme difficulty accessing public transport.

‘For the past two years, we have faced uncertainty with this service but, happily, the council has been able to continue funding it and our service users have not suffered any disruption.

‘Without the Red Cross transport service, they would risk social isolation.’

In 2012: Local talent was out in force last Friday when tthe king of rock ‘n’ roll AKA Robert McCallum was joined by gospel singing nuns including Jacqueline McCallum, Barbara McEachran, Rhona Cairns, Laura Lamont and Alice McCallum. A host of other acts also performed in aid of the sensory garden at Auchinlee Nursing Home.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday April 25, 1997

Mixed feelings about island ferry

Islay and Jura residents remain split over the proposed ferry link between Jura and Tayvallich because of arguments about likely follow-on effects.

Discussed for nearly 40 years, the link is currently being given serious consideration following the submission of environmental assessments to Argyll and Bute Council.

Providing an overland route to Islay through Jura, however, has forced a split between the residents on both islands.

‘Islay has lost 700 people in the last two generations,’ said Pat Roy of Islay, one of the supporters of the new link.

‘We have seen factory closures and are faced with the prospect of two school closures.

‘We are competing against other islands which have frequent ferry services. A greater choice of ferries has worked for Arran, Mull, Skye and on the Outer Isles,’ said Mr Roy.

‘We want to see a low-key environmentally-friendly development and see this as a way forward for the islands’ development,’ he added.

However, the majority of Jura residents are against the proposal with two referendums both revealing a 2-1 consensus against the idea.

‘People here seem to feel the benefits are outweighed by the disadvantages,’ said Liz Rozga, secretary of the community council.

Most residents said Jura was only being used as a stepping stone for Islay.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday April 27, 1972

Farms lashed by spring storms – appalling ground conditions

Last year, in April 1971, the rainfall recorded at Machrihanish for the whole month was 106mms, which was much higher than the previous four years.

After only 10 days of April 1972, recorded rainfall stood at 102mms.

A study of records at Machrihanish and Glasgow Airport indicates that 1972 will almost certainly be logged as the wettest April for 25 years.

The most damaging part of the weather has been in the last fortnight when exceptionally heavy rains have been experienced.

The obvious results of this are flooding and the scouring action of small torrents rushing down hillsides.

The small torrents can, in ploughed fields where the soil is not bound, gouge little canyons carrying everything before them – soil, seed and fertiliser.

Clearly these areas of erosion, if extensive, require to be ‘patched’.

Another obvious effect of the recent cold rains has been the effect on outside stock which do not thrive nearly so well if they have not got a dry bed. More energy has to be expended to keep up the body temperature.

Stress caused by the weather when added to calving or lambing stress can have profound effects.

One of the biggest losses is not seen – at least not at the moment – and that is the loss of recently applied fertiliser.

SEVENTY YEARS AGO
Saturday April 24, 1952

Plane mishap on Islay – pilot and seven passengers have a lucky escape

The pilot of a privately chartered aircraft and seven passengers had a lucky escape on Saturday afternoon when the aircraft struck the tip of a small bank and severely damaged its undercarriage when it landed on the runway at Glenegedale Airport, Islay.

The aircraft, operated by Air Enterprise and piloted by Captain Watson, was taking a party of seven passengers to Islay from Renfrew Airport.

As it was coming in over the Port Ellen to Bowmore road, the wheels of the plane apparently struck the bank. The plane rose in the air and made a heavy landing on the airfield. It tilted, but did not overturn.

An ambulance and crash tender, which constantly standby as this is the commercial airport for the island, rushed to the plane, but there was no fire and, beyond bruises and slight cuts and a shaking, none of the passengers or the pilot was injured. They were attended to by a local doctor.

Mr Helmut WB Schroder of a Dunlossit House, Port Askaig, Islay, who was in the plane, later told a reporter that he had flown to Renfrew from London earlier in the day. At Renfrew, he had met members of his house party who had come by car.

He said: ‘The wheels of the plane struck the bank. We were bumped up into the air and came down on the runway with a jolt.’

Editor’s note: Renfrew Airport was decommissioned in 1966.

In 1952: It is hard to believe that food rationing from the Second World War continued until 1954, two years into the reign of HM Queen Elizabeth. The Courier provided a handy cut-out-and-keep guide to where you should go to collect your new ration book.
In 1952: It is hard to believe that food rationing from the Second World War continued until 1954, two years into the reign of HM Queen Elizabeth. The Courier provided a handy cut-out-and-keep guide to where you should go to collect your new ration book.