From Our Files, April 22 2022

In 1997: Rough collies Brody, Fergus and Finley from Narrowfield Kennels meet the Drumlemble pupils. Launching a new project on children and dogs, the visit was the first of a series planned for primary schools throughout the area by Canine Concern and Narrowfield Kennels.
In 1997: Rough collies Brody, Fergus and Finley from Narrowfield Kennels meet the Drumlemble pupils. Launching a new project on children and dogs, the visit was the first of a series planned for primary schools throughout the area by Canine Concern and Narrowfield Kennels.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday April 20, 2012

Jubilee added to a busy June weekend

It will be a busy weekend in Campbeltown at the start of June, as the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee has been added to the local events calendar.

The celebrations have been agreed to take place on Saturday, June 2, the same weekend as the Mull of Kintyre (MOK) Run and also the Kintyre Songwriters Festival.

No jubilee plans had been put in place until Monday’s meeting of Campbeltown Community Council, when community councillors heard the time was running out to organise an event.

George Rahman from the Campbeltown branch of Royal British Legion Scotland said that they would be happy to arrange a parade involving sea and army cadets, but only if the community wanted one.

Community councillors rallied behind the idea, with David Mayo suggesting it would be a disgrace not to mark the jubilee.

In other towns, celebrations are taking place at different times across the week leading up to the jubilee; after some debate, it was decided to go for Saturday, June 2, in Campbeltown.

The feeling was that a celebration could create a good atmosphere for the large number of people coming to the town for the MOK Run.

Several community council members volunteered to go on a subcommittee to organise the event.

In 2012: Donna McCrimmon was presented with a basket of flowers from Fallon Dunlop at the opening of Argyll Bowling Club’s green for the new season on Saturday. Donna, the daughter of President Donny McCrimmon, had the honour of throwing the first jack.
In 2012: Donna McCrimmon was presented with a basket of flowers from Fallon Dunlop at the opening of Argyll Bowling Club’s green for the new season on Saturday. Donna, the daughter of President Donny McCrimmon, had the honour of throwing the first jack.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday April 25, 1997

Dog-gone day at Drumlemble

Drumlemble Primary School pupils had some unusual guests this week when they were visited by Brody, Fergus and Finley – three rough collies.

Launching a new project on children and dogs, the visit was the first of a series which are being planned for primary schools throughout the area by Canine Concern and Narrowfield Kennels.

Combining a video on dog handling along with a practical display, the project is being organised by Mrs Marjorie Henley Price of Canine Concern Scotland Trust, and Mr and Mrs Keith and Greer Abendroth of Narrowfield Kennels.

Touring schools throughout Kintyre and Mid Argyll, the project provides information and tips for children on how to behave with dogs.

Simultaneously involved in therapist duties – visiting elderly or infirm residents in hospital on a weekly basis – the dogs are becoming more and more busy but anyone interested in arranging a visit should contact Narrowfield Kennels.

Shoes do the walk

Next week sees the end of an era when Neil Kennedy’s shoe shop in Cross Street moves to trade from larger premises in Longrow.

Neil’s great grandfather opened a shoe shop in Campbeltown’s Main Street in 1875, and moved into the present shop in Cross Street when Longrow South was built in 1905.

Neil’s wife Marie said: ‘Neil and I are looking forward to working together and all our customers from Cross Street are assured of a warm welcome and the same standards of service in Longrow.’

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday April 20, 1972

Five-year plan for fishing fleet

A £3.3 million programme over the next five years to increase fishing fleets in the Highlands and Islands by 250 vessels was put forward this week.

This is the substance of recommendations by the Highlands and Islands Development Board (HIDB) which are at present being considered by the government.

The board hopes to get a decision in the course of the next few months.

The recommendations arise from a report commissioned last July by the board from Mr William Russell, a former assistant secretary to the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.

His remit was to study the social and economic impact of investment in the fisheries of the Highlands and Islands.

The report published this week includes a survey by Mr MP Jackson on the situation in and around Campbeltown.

Campbeltown, says the report, was included as a classic example of urban decline resulting from the failure of primary industries.

Shipbuilding, herring fishing and coal mining had each slumped to the point where, in the 1960s, there was a real crisis of confidence in the future viability of the town.

The revival of the shipyard and the switch from herring to more reliable nephrop and white fishing, both with HIDB support, suggested some degree of stabilisation of the situation by 1971.

The report goes on to study the general position of the Campbeltown area over the last 20 years in order to put the fishing industry in its proper prospective.

In this period, the board said, sufficient investment and effort had been significant.

The herring slump in the ’50s badly affected the Campbeltown fishermen, both financially and in morale.

The uncertainties arising from possible effects of Common Market membership on inshore fisheries are a further factor in the fishermen’s current feeling of caution.

SEVENTY YEARS AGO
Thursday April 17, 1952

Fishermen seek state subsidy

Dire need for a government subsidy for the herring fishing industry was emphasised by Mr Gilbert McIntosh, chairman of the Carradale branch of the Clyde Fisheries Association (CFA), speaking at Campbeltown on Friday night, April 4.

Mr McIntosh was making a complimentary speech at the annual social; a dance held by the Campbeltown branch of the CFA and popularly known as the ‘Spawny Ball’.

The function was held in the Victoria Hall and was attended by a gathering of 400 fishermen, their wives and friends.

Lifeboats for cattle criticised

The surprise purchase by Argyll County Council of four lifeboats for ferrying cattle between the islands and mainland of Argyll was criticised at a meeting of the county council last Thursday at Campbeltown.

Mr JJ Currie, Campbeltown, a former president of the Highland Cattle Society and a well-known county farmer, told the council that it was not a good proposition.

‘The craft might be alright as lifeboats but as cattle boats, no, they could not ask the cattle to sit still in a boat,’ he commented.

He did not think the boats would have sufficient buoyancy.

Dr John AC Guy, the county Medical Officer of Health, who was asked for his observations, agreed with Mr Curry.

‘They are not ideal for taking cattle,’ he pointed out.

Mrs MB MacNaughton, Glendaruel, also a farmer, supported Mr Currie’s point of view and said she would not feel very comfortable about these boats being used for cattle or sheep.