From our Files, April 15 2022

In 1997: Red Nose Day at Tarbert Academy. Both primary and secondary school had a great time on Comic Relief Day – so great in fact the pupils, parents and teachers were ‘relived’ to the tune of £365.
In 1997: Red Nose Day at Tarbert Academy. Both primary and secondary school had a great time on Comic Relief Day – so great in fact the pupils, parents and teachers were ‘relived’ to the tune of £365.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday April 13, 2012

Whisky bar opens at the Ardshiel

A master blender at Whyte and MacKay described his time in Campbeltown as ‘memorable’ as he officially opened a whisky bar at a local refurbished hotel.

The Ardshiel Hotel celebrated four years of continuous work since it was taken over in January 2008.

Flora Grant and Marion MacKinnon have renovated and developed the hotel into a traditional Scottish place to stay and the newly-refurbished whisky bar reflects this, attracting guests from all over the world.

Richard Peterson, world famous master blender at Whyte and MacKay, contacted them to offer to carry out the presentation to mark the opening.

He learnt about the art of distilling and blending in Campbeltown more than 40 years ago.

In 2012: Scott Grierson, Richard Paterson, world famous master blender of Whyte and MacKay and Graeme Muir of Whyte and MacKay, with Flora Grant and Marion MacKinnon of the Ardshiel Hotel.
In 2012: Scott Grierson, Richard Paterson, world famous master blender of Whyte and MacKay and Graeme Muir of Whyte and MacKay, with Flora Grant and Marion MacKinnon of the Ardshiel Hotel.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday April 11, 1997

Sick fines for hirers

Vomiting in, or otherwise soiling, a taxi could lead to the offender being ‘fined’ up to £50.

The new ‘soiling charge’ is to be introduced for taxis throughout Argyll and Bute on July 1, if Argyll and Bute’s Policy Committee approves the new set of proposed taxi fares.

Payable by the hirer, the new soiling charge is just one of a package of fare changes which the policy committee has to agree on to replace the existing fare structure.

The council is required to undertake a consultation and review of taxi fares within its area on a regular basis.

Under new proposals, tariff costs and timings will change for all taxis in Argyll and Bute.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday April 13, 1972

Necklace safely home

The 3,500-year-old jet necklace found by workmen at Kintyre Nurseries last year arrived in Campbeltown on Tuesday after special preservation work had been carried out on it.

The necklace was handed over to Provost George McMillan by Mr JBI McTavish, Queen’s and Lord Treasurer’s Remembrancer.

Since its discovery, doctors and students at Glasgow University’s archaeology class have worked to preserve it.

The necklace was found bead by bead and had to be strung together.

In handing it over to the Provost, Mr McTavish said the handing over of this magnificent necklace was the highlight of his year.

In 1952: A 3,500-year-old jet necklace found by workmen at Kintyre Nurseries returned to Campbeltown after special preservation work had been carried out on it.
In 1952: A 3,500-year-old jet necklace found by workmen at Kintyre Nurseries returned to Campbeltown after special preservation work had been carried out on it.

‘It is in excellent condition and one of the best preservations I have ever seen,’ he added.

In accepting the necklace, the Provost thanked Mr McTavish for making the journey to Campbeltown with the priceless treasure and for delivering it safely.

The Provost then handed the necklace over to Dean of Guild John Anderson, Convener of the Library Committee.

Mr Anderson said the necklace will always be treasured in Campbeltown’s museum and that many would journey to see it.

The necklace was given to the Town Chamberlain for safekeeping.

Editor’s note: The Crown’s representative in Scotland is the Queen’s and Lord Treasurer’s Remembrancer. Treasure trove belongs to the Crown and is usually allocated to museums. The Scottish Archaeological Finds Allocation Panel, a small, specialist advisory panel, supports the Queen’s and Lord Treasurer’s Remembrancer in the administration of the Treasure Trove system, liaising with the National Museum of Scotland. Follow the Treasure Trove Unit on Twitter and see what’s been found. Remember, if you find something, you should report it to them. See its webpage for advice: treasuretrovescotland.co.uk

Biggest roup at Lochgilphead

The largest public roup ever held in Lochgilphead took place in the Stag Hotel on Friday afternoon, when the Forestry Commission sold 31 building plots at the Whitegates site for nearly £42,000.

The most expensive plot went under the hammer at £2,700, while only one plot failed to make its upset price of £870.

Eventually this was sold when the reserve price was reduced and, in the end, it was sold for only £20 less than its original price.

About a quarter of the plots were bought by local people with the rest going to undisclosed buyers.

Editor’s note: ‘Roup’ is a Scottish word for auction and the upset price is the lowest at which an auction item can be sold.

SEVENTY YEARS AGO
Thursday April 10, 1952

Television comes to Islay

It was announced on Monday that television has at last been received on the island of Islay.

This is now the most westerly point of Scotland where it has been received. Up to this time, Campbeltown had claimed that distinction.

A radio mechanic, Mr Herbert Butterworth, had tried out a commercial receiver at Bowmore – in the centre of the island – but could only get sound.

On March 30, it was decided to transport the set and equipment to the Mull of Oa at the southernmost point of the island. There, excellent pictures and sound work were received.

The school teacher there, Miss Catherine Cameron, agreed to have the set installed and, on the following Tuesday, watched the programme with no interference and startling clarity.

Glen Lussa hydro-electric scheme to be extended

To meet the rapid increase in demand for electricity in Kintyre, the North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board’s £1 million scheme at Glen Lussa, six miles north of Campbeltown, is to be further extended by a new project costing £310,000.

The scheme will extend the present catchment area of the 12.6 miles by almost three miles.

It will increase the output of electricity by about 2¼ million units per annum; that is from 8½ million to 10¾ million units.

The need for this is largely due to the increase in the public demand for electric cookers, in addition to new housing developments in Campbeltown, the continued demand for power for the Argyll Colliery at Machrihanish and the demand for farms to be electrified and given electrical milking machines, sterilising plant and milk coolers.