From Our Files, December 10 2021

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday December 9, 2011

Getting twitchy about Tesco

What is happening to the plans for the new Tesco for Campbeltown and the brand new creamery?

Has the project got caught up in the row between big business and the Scottish Government about its plans to levy a tax on major retailers?

A reliable source told the Courier: ‘Everyone in the farming community is getting a bit twitchy about it, but no one is going to talk to you about it, negotiations are still going on.’

And added: ‘Everyone is under strict instructions not to talk to any of the press about this but First Milk are getting so fed up with this they have gone to the Scottish Government and asked if they can use the money to upgrade the existing creamery instead.’

Tenders had gone out and local companies were approached for quotes for the new creamery.

The proposed new creamery is to be funded from three sources: up to £3.9 million from the Scottish Government; the sale of the existing creamery site to Tesco and funds from First Milk.

It is the largest grant given to a single dairy company by the Scottish Government.

In 2011: James McCorkindale School of Dance took over the hall at Campbeltown Grammar School to stage a Celtic Odyssey, a tribute to Scottish and Irish dance. Some of the younger dancers were transformed into wraiths to perform Ghosts of Macdonald, based on the Glencoe Massacre. From left: Amy Lang, Iona McKinlay, Hannah Brown, Linzi Cameron, Eilidh Anderson, Emily McLean, Shannon Charlwood and Lisa McKellar.
In 2011: James McCorkindale School of Dance took over the hall at Campbeltown Grammar School to stage a Celtic Odyssey, a tribute to Scottish and Irish dance. Some of the younger dancers were transformed into wraiths to perform Ghosts of Macdonald, based on the Glencoe Massacre. From left: Amy Lang, Iona McKinlay, Hannah Brown, Linzi Cameron, Eilidh Anderson, Emily McLean, Shannon Charlwood and Lisa McKellar.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday December 6, 1996

The generations join in the fight to keep ‘Campbeltonians’

An 82-year-old Campbeltown mother of 10 has hit out at the decision to send young mums to Glasgow to have their babies.

Mrs Flora McSporran, who lives at Auchinlee Eventide Home on High Askomil, was disgusted to hear that local GPs were referring all planned pregnancies to a Glasgow hospital.

And even though they will still handle emergency births at Campbeltown Hospital, the decision was made on safety grounds.

GPs in the Argyll and Clyde Health Board area’s more rural hospitals felt that because the number of births has dropped over the years, busier city-based hospitals would be better equipped to cope.

But Mrs McSporran, who had most of her 10 children at home near Stewarton, says the decision is a disgrace and feels it will cause severe problems for young families.

‘It’s very bad to send strong, healthy girls to Glasgow. For many of them it will mean leaving their families behind and not getting any visitors,’ said Mrs McSporran.

‘It’s not giving them a chance and the girls are not wanting to go. There are plenty of good doctors and nurses in Campbeltown who could handle all the local deliveries.’

Mrs McSporran also feels the decision will waste money which could be used to continue allowing births to take place in Campbeltown.

‘They spent a lot of money building that big new hospital and now they won’t let babies be born here,’ she said.

Mrs McSporran decided to speak out after reading a letter from expectant mother Debbie Paterson in last week’s Campbeltown Courier.

Debbie, of Queen Street, has been praised by local people for her efforts to set up a pressure group to fight the decisions and is now asking people to write to the Argyll and Clyde Health Board about the matter.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday December 9, 1971

Lifeboat rescues nine people during launch

Campbeltown lifeboat was in action again on Saturday, when a 23-foot boat with nine people aboard, including two children, was towed off the Dhorlin sandbank and into Campbeltown.

The drama began when the engine aboard the lighthouse boat, operated by Bailie George McMillan, failed and the vessel drifted helplessly towards the Dhorlin.

The plight was seen from Baraskomill Farm, and police were alerted. Then employees at the NATO POL depot saw flares and the lifeboat honorary secretary Mr JP McWhirter made arrangements for his crew to standby.

However, Coxswain Archie Malcolm and crew member Charles McNaughton went down the loch in the fishing boat Girl Margaret, hoping to get close enough to the casualty to tow her off.

But the vessel’s draught proved too much and they returned to the Old Quay where the reserve lifeboat was waiting with engines running.

A line was fired from the lifeboat to the launch and she was successfully towed off. All the passengers remained abroad until the boats berthed at Campbeltown.

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday December 10, 1921

Interesting golden wedding – Mr and Mrs John Barbour, Southend

Mr and Mrs John Barbour Aucharua, Southend, celebrated the 50th anniversary of their wedding on Thursday 24th November, when they were the recipients of warm congratulations and good wishes from the wide circle of relatives and friends.

There is no better known or more highly-respected family circle in Kintyre than that which has its centre at Aucharua Farm, and the attainment by the ‘old folks’ of such an outstanding event in their lives created the liveliest interest in the district.

Mr Barbour has, for longer than most can remember, been identified in a prominent way not only with the agricultural interest of the district but with public affairs in general, and his fine character has gained for him the esteem of his fellows in a very remarkable degree.

Mr Barbour is a native of West Kilbride, but he had settled at Aucharua before his marriage on 24th November, 1871, to Margaret Gemmell, daughter of the late Thomas Gemmell, Dalrioch.

The ministers who officiated on that occasion were the Rev John Cameron (now deceased), Minister of Castlehill Church, and the Rev J Russell of the Highland Parish Church, the latter still to the fore, but now Doctor of Divinity, ex Moderator, and grand old man of the Church of Scotland.

Both best man and bridesmaid of 50 years ago are still alive, but neither of them was able to attend the celebration last week, as they are far away from this district now.

The gathering at Aucharua last Thursday night, when the occasion was fittingly celebrated, was a large and interesting one, consisting of members of the family, friends and neighbours.

Among those present were six sons, four daughters, four sons-in-law, four daughters-in-law and 22 grandchildren.

After a service of cake and wine, the guests adjourned to the old cheese room, which was laid out and tastefully decorated as a dining room.

There were 58 people between young and old sat down to a sumptuous dinner, to which ample justice was done by all.

Reverend Angus J MacVicar, of whose church Mr and Mrs Barbour have been loyal members all their days, proposed the toast of the evening.

In doing so he extended to Mr and Mrs Barbour, in name of everybody present, hearty congratulations on this unique and the most interesting occasion, the 50th anniversary of their wedding.

They had walked together all the way these 50 years, and it was the sincere hope of all who knew them that they would be spared to one another for many a year yet.

They had borne the burden and heat of the day together, they had served their generation well, and now in the evening of the days it was hoped that they would be permitted to go softly, to have ease and every happiness and comfort and blessing.

They all joined with Mr and Mrs Barbour in thanking God for His goodness to them, for the many blessings they had received at His hands, and for bringing them in health and strength to this day.