From Our Files, September 24 2021

In 2011: Bowlers donned their pink attire on Sunday to raise funds for the Breast Cancer Campaign. A total of 16 pairs took part in the competition at Campbeltown Bowling Club competing for the George and Jenny MacKay Memorial Trophy. As well as the bowling competition, there was also a baking stall and a barbecue to help boost funds. A total of £711 was raised on the day with members dressing up in pink to join in with the occasion. The final, between Jean Miller and Steven Dickson, and Angus Brodie and Alistair MacKay, was a closely fought match which resulted in a measure at the last end giving Jean and Steven the win.
In 2011: Bowlers donned their pink attire on Sunday to raise funds for the Breast Cancer Campaign. A total of 16 pairs took part in the competition at Campbeltown Bowling Club competing for the George and Jenny MacKay Memorial Trophy. As well as the bowling competition, there was also a baking stall and a barbecue to help boost funds. A total of £711 was raised on the day with members dressing up in pink to join in with the occasion. The final, between Jean Miller and Steven Dickson, and Angus Brodie and Alistair MacKay, was a closely fought match which resulted in a measure at the last end giving Jean and Steven the win.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday September 23, 2011

Weed and silt causing havoc at Tayinloan

Islanders are losing out, not just when the weather is bad, but also due to the ongoing saga of weed and silt blocking the Tayinloan ferry birth.

Gigha’s residents are becoming restless after waiting years for the problems to be sorted out by Argyll and Bute Council, and last week the island’s farmers had to dump 9,000 litres of milk; roughly about £2,225 worth, between three farms.

The MV Loch Ranza was affected by the gales last Wednesday and made one round-trip from the island to Kennacraig Ferry Terminal, but because of tidal conditions had to wait almost two hours before being able to get into the ramp linkspan, the crossing therefore stretching to six hours.

The same day the ferry was unable to get into Tayinloan for the milk tanker even though it was a calm and sunny day; the weed and silt playing havoc with the ferry.

The Gigha Hotel lost considerable business, both through the ferry service being affected by the gales and others not taking the risk and cancelling weekend bookings at the hotel.

‘I fear for the CalMac service during the winter if this is what we are seeing so early. The weed build-up was easily the most serious yet,’ said one islander, who did not want to be named.

‘It is ridiculous to think the ferry skippers have had to put up with this since 2002. The whole thing should have been sorted out years ago.’

Originally the council said the work would be completed by May this year but several setbacks mean the work will not start until the third week of October.

The project will incorporate a sand bypass, slipway widening and repairs, suspended deck structure, and essential timber repairs. The old pier to the north will also be demolished.

A small dredger arrived last Friday to start weed clearing on Saturday and was expected to remain in the area for up to a week.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday September 20, 1996

Sandra to train Olympic athletes

Sandra Kilpatrick, a day centre officer from the Woodlands Special Needs Centre, has been selected as an athletics coach for the Special Olympics 1997 UK games.

A qualified assistant athletics coach, she has been working at the Woodlands Centre with special needs clients for about five years, the last three of which have been spent specifically as the sports coordinator.

Starting this month though, Sandra will now be responsible for the training of athletes from all over the west of Scotland in preparation for the 1997 games.

‘Initially, the position will involve one full day’s training a week up until Christmas but at that point we will have to choose the teams and from then on the training will undoubtedly increase,’ she said.

‘Choosing the athletes is of course going to be very difficult,’ she added.

The games, which are to be held in Portsmouth from July 11 to July 19, will involve athletes from all over Britain competing in a multitude of events and disciplines.

Around 230 competitors will be chosen from across western Scotland for the games with about 50 out of 200 being chosen specifically for the athletics.

It is going to cost approximately £330 for each athlete to go to the games and the money is being raised from a number of sources.

Sandra is involved with the Kintyre Special Needs Sports Group, a registered charity which will be running a variety of fundraising events. But the majority of the funding is going to be coming from Special Olympics Scotland West which is also a registered charity.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday September 23, 1971

A satisfactory year for tourism

The information offices run by Mid Argyll, Kintyre and Islay Tourist Organisation have dealt with 47,425 personal callers during the 1971 season to date; so stated Mr MacKinnon, the area tourist officer, during an interview with the Courier this week.

The Campbeltown centre handled just under 20,000 of this total, with August proving to be the busiest month of the year.

In 1966 the enquiries recorded at Campbeltown totalled 3,000.

He said: ‘Many of the observations and complaints received by the staff have remained remarkably similar throughout the last 10 years.

‘For example, in 1967, the records show visitors complained because of a lack of wash hand, toilet and refuse disposal facilities around the pier area; no caravan site in the proximity of the town; no car ferry link with Arran; the inadequacy of bus, boat and fishing trips, except from mid-July to mid-August; and a lack of properly organised entertainment, especially for children.

‘Unfortunately these complaints were repeated in 1971.’

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday September 24, 1921

Sparks and flashes

Bute Mountain Battery, to the number of 60, are this week in camp at Buddon.

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There were nine local applications for the post of Town Chamberlain, but none of them go onto the short leet.

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The prospects of keeping home fires burning in these hard times are improving. Drumlemble coal is now selling at 35s [£1.55] a ton.

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The harvest is now over in Kintyre, and the crops everywhere have been got into the stackyard in good condition and excellent bulk.

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The war memorial tablet in Longrow UF Church will be dedicated on Sunday 2nd October, by the Rev Alex Wylie Blue of Belfast.

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Much bagpipe playing is heard in town these nights. Pipers and dancers are getting ready for the big Highland Gathering in November.

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The movement to form an Ex-Service Men’s Club in Campbeltown is now almost ready for launching. Premises in Union Street are being equipped, and the opening ceremony has been fixed for Friday evening, 30th inst.