From Our Files, September 17 2021

In 1996: Six Tesco employees proved the sky's the limit recently by abseiling 500 feet down Blackpool Tower. And the brave ladies raised a staggering £2,000 for muscular dystrophy in the process. They took the leap after Tesco stores throughout the country put out a call for staff to take part in the abseil. Most stores taking part put forward one or two members of staff but the Campbeltown store came up trumps with six staff volunteering. Morna O'May, Louise MacKay, Eilidh Smith, Patricia Glen, Catherine Deans and Lindsay Edwards took the plunge and between them raised half of the £4,000 total which was raised in Scotland.
In 1996: Six Tesco employees proved the sky's the limit recently by abseiling 500 feet down Blackpool Tower. And the brave ladies raised a staggering £2,000 for muscular dystrophy in the process. They took the leap after Tesco stores throughout the country put out a call for staff to take part in the abseil. Most stores taking part put forward one or two members of staff but the Campbeltown store came up trumps with six staff volunteering. Morna O'May, Louise MacKay, Eilidh Smith, Patricia Glen, Catherine Deans and Lindsay Edwards took the plunge and between them raised half of the £4,000 total which was raised in Scotland.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday September 16, 2011

Pubwatch scheme sees more people banned

There has been an increase in the number of people being banned from pubs in Campbeltown through the Pubwatch scheme.

There are currently 33 offenders on the banned list, with 25 on the list this time last year.

The Kintyre Licensed Trade Association (KLTA), which is made up of licensees from across the area, including public houses, restaurants, off-licences and hotels, decides whether someone should be on the list.

Pubwatch is designed to help reduce crime and antisocial behaviour as well as ensuring a safe environment to socialise in.

In the past, a person who was barred by one licensed premise could simply enter another where they would be free to continue their antisocial behaviour.

Pubwatch effectively stops this, so that when the offender is barred from one, they are barred from all the members’ licensed premises; every licensed premises in Campbeltown is now a member of the scheme.

Changes have now been put in place to increase the length of bans given out. This can however be reduced if the person provides the KLTA committee with a photograph of themselves for identification purposes.

Only members of the association can propose any person for a ban; this is discussed by the committee, which decides if a ban is appropriate.

The person is given the opportunity to appeal or make a statement in their defence by writing to the committee.

The KLTA secretary said: ‘From a policing point of view, the scheme is fantastic. Identifying troublemakers and barring them from every bar can only benefit the majority of people who enjoy socialising in Campbeltown and the surrounding area.

‘Keeping these people away from licensed premises provides a safer environment for all.

‘The association brings local licensees together to not only discussed Pubwatch but all issues around licensing including the police’s role.’

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday September 13, 1996

Going wild over ‘Wild Argyll’

Wild Argyll, the diary of events in the countryside launched three years ago by Argyll and the Islands Enterprise as a guide for visitors, is proving to be a marketing tool for the area on a world-wide scale.

Requests for the trailblazing brochure, which is funded by AIE and the European LEADER programme, have come from addresses in unexpected places including Russia, Argentina, India and the Middle East.

Wild Argyll was inspired by the desire of local people to help visitors see Argyll’s magnificent scenery as more than a background, to introduce them to the wildlife and plant life and all the outdoor activities that are part of rural living.

The events diary extends from April to October and is available from tourist information centres or by post.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday September 16, 1971

Entertainment being ‘wiped out’ – councillor

Councillor Archibald McCallum on Monday evening made a last ditch attempt to keep the Campbeltown Town Hall open after 11pm at beat dances.

At the monthly meeting of the Town Council, he said that teenage entertainment was being wiped out altogether.

‘Stronger efforts could be made to control the noise,’ he said.

Councillor McCallum added that dances were only run in the town hall when the Victoria Hall was not available, about six times a year.

His amendment to the minute was seconded by Councillor Dan McIntyre.

Councillor William Campbell said it was quite ridiculous to terminate the let of the hall at 11pm. If dances were to be stopped at 11pm, he moved then, they should be abolished altogether. He was seconded by Councillor Dan Black.

Councillor Campbell’s amendment found seven votes against Councillor McCallum’s two. The original decision was carried by eight votes to three.

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday September 17, 1921

Sparks and flashes

Mr Crawford, Castle Douglas, has just completed extensive purchases of spring calving cows from Kintyre, for export in November. Prices are back a bit since last year but for ‘guid anes’ quite good money was to be got.

* * *

The evening continuation classes commence for the winter in Campbeltown on Monday 3rd October. Intending students will be enrolled in the Grammar and Dalintober schools on Friday, 30th September. Details with regard to the classes will be found in advertisement.

[Editor’s note: Continuation classes enabled pupils from poorer families who had to leave school to begin work to continue their education.]

* * *

The local thieving community apparently imagine that there is a gold mine somewhere in the neighbourhood of the Courier Office in Longrow.

Most of the business premises nearby have been entered by thieves within recent months.

The latest attempt was at the office of Messrs J H Mackenzie and Co last weekend, to which the burglars gained entrance, succeeded in overturning the safe, but got nothing for their pains.

* * *

A Juvenile Court was once again necessary this week – Sheriff Macmaster Campbell presiding. The inquiry was made regarding the breaking into the shop of Miss Gillion, Longrow, and the theft therefrom of quantities of sweets.

A boy of 12 was accused, and two little fellows of seven and nine respectively were the witnesses.

The premises had been entered by the back window, which had apparently been left unsecured, being protected on the outside by iron bars.

One of the little chaps, however, had squeezed his way between the bars, and handed out the plunder.

There was contradictory evidence as to the actual share of the older boy in the adventure, and the charge against him was not established, though he admitted sharing the sweets.

He was dismissed with a warning.