Song release marks World Suicide Prevention Day

Jamie Titterton, known as Jacob and the Starry Eyed Shadows, has released the single Talk Me Down.
Jamie Titterton, known as Jacob and the Starry Eyed Shadows, has released the single Talk Me Down.

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A Kintyre singer songwriter has released a new single called Talk Me Down today, Friday September 10, on World Suicide Prevention Day.

Jamie Titterton, who goes by the stage name Jacob and the Starry Eyed Shadows, said: ‘The song is about mental health and suicide and the importance of human connection to protect ourselves and each other from negative outcomes.’

Jamie Titterton, known as Jacob and the Starry Eyed Shadows, has released the single Talk Me Down.
Jamie Titterton, known as Jacob and the Starry Eyed Shadows, has released the single Talk Me Down.

The release has been supported by the Argyll and Bute Suicide Prevention Group which continues to meet and make developments in raising awareness of suicide prevention and reducing stigma that suicide can still bring.

Fiona Davies, interim chief officer for Argyll and Bute Health and Social Care Partnership and chair of the Argyll and Bute Suicide Prevention Group, said: ‘Through this song, Jamie raises the importance of reaching out to one another and how starting a conversation with someone can help save a life.

‘In Argyll and Bute, we are encouraging these important conversations by asking “are you ok?” and we are delighted to support Jamie through showing support for his song which we hope will help raise awareness of suicide prevention.’

This work complements the recent announcement of the Scottish Government-funded Suicide Bereavement Support Service which is now live in Argyll and Bute and is available for anyone who has been affected by suicide of a loved one.

This service is also available for children and young people.

You can contact this service if you have been bereaved by suicide since August last year and referrals can be made directly or through your local police station.

Specially-trained staff will provide compassionate and personal support based on the individual or family’s needs.

This may be with practical things such as support to make funeral arrangements, or talking to other agencies such as funeral directors, faith-based leaders or Police Scotland.

Staff will also be there to simply listen and be a source of support as families come to terms with their loss.

You can contact the service directly by emailing suicidebereavementsupport@nhs.scot or telephoning 0800 471 4768.

The service is not staffed seven days a week so please leave a message if your call is not answered. Staff from Support in Mind Scotland aim to respond to all referrals within 24 hours.

In a bid to encourage people to get outdoors and start a conversation with others, Police Scotland has teamed up with Argyll and Bute Suicide Prevention Group to create ‘friendship benches’.

Dunoon Men's Shed has provided funding towards the benches and has built and painted them ready for them to be installed across Argyll.
Dunoon Men’s Shed has provided funding towards the benches and has built and painted them ready for them to be installed across Argyll.

The benches, which will be located throughout Argyll, will have information plaques affixed to them in case anyone feels they may benefit from suicide prevention services including Samaritans, Breathing Space or SHOUT.

SHOUT is a 24/7 service for those who would rather text than talk. People can be connected with a volunteer by texting the word ‘Shout’ to 85258.

‘We want everyone in our communities to feel more comfortable about talking about their feelings,’ said Superintendent Douglas Wilson of Argyll and West Dunbartonshire Police Division.

‘If you are feeling in low mood then you need to be able to speak with someone – that can either be someone trained such as Samaritans, Breathing Space or through text to SHOUT, but can also be a family member, friend, neighbour, work colleague or your GP.

‘We are delighted that this project has been a real community venture with support and participation from a number of different community groups and organisations from throughout Argyll and Bute.’