From Our Files, September 3 2021

In 2011: Rachael O'May brought the JC Forrest Challenge Trophy back to Kintyre after being crowned Argyll Champion for under 16s at Cowal Highland Gathering.
In 2011: Rachael O'May brought the JC Forrest Challenge Trophy back to Kintyre after being crowned Argyll Champion for under 16s at Cowal Highland Gathering.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday September 2, 2011

Dancers step up to the mark at Cowal Highland Gathering

Kintyre’s dancers have excelled themselves once again and brought home an array of silverware.

A group from James McCorkindale’s School of Dance took part in the various competitions at Cowal Highland Gathering, winning different age categories.

With competition fierce, the girls did themselves and the town proud and brought home some top awards.

Rachael O’May brought the JC Forrest Challenge Trophy back to Kintyre after being crowned Argyll Champion for under 16s.

The trophy has been won seven times since 1926 by a Kintyre dancer and was last won in 2005 by Jennifer McMillan.

Also at Cowal Highland Gathering Iona MacKinlay won the Newbury Shield for beginners; Linzi Cameron won the Gerald and Mary Simmons Memorial Trophy for winner of the intermediate section; Emma Bannatyne lifted the Rita Ford Trophy for runner up Argyll Champion, under 13 years; and Eilidh Anderson won the John Brown Memorial Trophy for the intermediate runner up.

In 2011: The other James McCorkindale dancers who picked up silverware at Cowal Highland Gathering, from left: Iona MacKinlay, Linzi Cameron, Emma Bannatyne and Eilidh Anderson.
In 2011: The other James McCorkindale dancers who picked up silverware at Cowal Highland Gathering, from left: Iona MacKinlay, Linzi Cameron, Emma Bannatyne and Eilidh Anderson.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday August 30, 1996

World record set in Kintyre

A new world record was set in Kintyre this week when two competitive jet-skiers took on the unfathomable force and surging waves of the Atlantic Ocean.

Wesley Park and Keith Brocklebank, both 24, of Lincolnshire, set a new world record by jet-skiing from Machrihanish Beach to Northern Ireland and back again on Monday.

It was the first time that jet-skis had been used to cross the channel and back.

And even though the daring duo were elated at their achievement at the end of the amazing seven-hour feat, both were adamant that it would be a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Wesley, a senior aircraftsman in the RAF, said the ordeal was something he would never forget.

But he summed up the fear instilled by the experience in one sentence: ‘The swells were bigger than houses – I thought we were going to be killed at one point.’

Both Wesley and Keith have plenty of jet-skiing experience and compete in some of the sport’s top major competitions.

Wesley is about to start his winter season of competitions and Keith is the number two in the European Championships.

They decided to come to Machrihanish to try to set the record as well as to raise cash for charity.

So far, their Kintyre adventure has raised more than £500 from donations in Lincolnshire plus extra cash which has been collected by Wesley’s father John, who is a police officer in Londonderry.

John also aided his son and Keith during the jet-ski by standing by to refuel them when they arrived on the Northern Ireland coast on a beach near Ballycastle.

The trip, which included jet-skiing round Rathlin Island off the coast of Northern Ireland, was 108 miles in total and took just under seven hours to compete.

Wesley thanked Sergeant John Biggins and Constable Chris Hale of Strathclyde Police in Campbeltown who recorded the official times of the crossing.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday September 2, 1971

Ancient necklace found on local site

The largest Bronze Age jet necklace ever to be discovered in Argyll has been unearthed by members of a joint University of Glasgow and Argyll County Council class on British archaeology.

The necklace was found on a construction site near the Highland Parish Church, Campbeltown.

One of the students in the archaeology class, Father James Webb, reported to Dr E J Peltenburg that what appeared to be a stone burial cist had been found. Dr Peltenburg is resident tutor for Argyll.

Despite the fact the cist was badly damaged, Father Webb and Mr Duncan Colville recorded the visible remains with a camera and notes.

When excavation began, parts of a skeleton and a flint knife were uncovered.

Jet beads and spacer plates lay near the head of the body.

The beads formed the magnificent necklace which, after having been treated with a preservative at the Glasgow Art Gallery and Museum, has been re-constructed to what appears to be its original state.

It is one of the largest and complete necklaces known. It is hoped to display the discovery in Campbeltown museum soon.

ONE-HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday September 3, 1921

Midnight skylarking

At the Burgh Police Court on Saturday – Bailie Campbell on the bench – two young fellows were convicted of having committed a breach of the peace at the Old Quay Head in the early hours of the morning of the 13th August.

The disturbance took place between 12 and 1 o’clock and seemed to have been much of the nature of skylarking.

The Burgh Procurator Fiscal said there was far too much of this roaming about at night by young fellows, who disturbed respectable people by their conduct.

In answer to the Bailie, one of the accused, quite a young lad, stated that he had not worked for two years; he could not get anything to do.

Bailie Campbell expressed surprise and regret that a respectable-looking young fellow should be going to waste in this way.

Everybody was painfully aware of the amount of unemployment that existed at present, and it seemed to him that too many of the young men who were not working remained in bed till all hours of the day, and then roamed about at all hours of the night when respectable people should be in bed.

This congregating about corners and especially the making of disturbances during the hours of sleep must be put a stop to.

While the offence deserved severe punishment, he would not in the circumstances impose a heavy penalty which the accused might be unable to pay.

The fine would be one of 10 shillings each, with the alternative of seven days in jail.

Harvesting without horses

Harvesting without horses was conducted this week for the first time in Kintyre.

Messers Duncan Ramsay & Son have been demonstrating with a Fordson tractor on the farm of Strath.