Down Memory Lane, August 6 2021

Campbeltown Penny Savings Bank regularly published its accounts in the Courier.
Campbeltown Penny Savings Bank regularly published its accounts in the Courier.

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Money matters

In a hundred years we have gone from penny banks to Bitcoin.

The cuttings on this page, taken from a 1921 edition of the Courier, provide details about transactions at Campbeltown Penny Savings Bank and report on the issue of local housing bonds.

The penny bank was for the very low earners; a bank account with a cheque book was only for the very wealthy.

As a social enterprise, it published its accounts regularly in the Courier.

The town council could also raise money for its major ventures by borrowing from the general public. In an era when banks could fail, a local bond was a secure form of long-term saving with the added security that the council was a government entity.

The town council was issuing local housing bonds at six per cent in 1921.
The town council was issuing local housing bonds at six per cent in 1921.

It also meant that money earned in Kintyre stayed here and such bonds always offered a very good rate of interest.

It makes you wonder what could be done with a modern interpretation of the idea.

Today, cryptocurrency – digital or virtual money – like Bitcoin and Dogecoin have been used to purchase many things including cars, airline tickets and even university tuition!