From Our Files, June 18 2021

In 2011: Machrihanish Golf Club's ladies competed in their annual Ladies Charity Open. Playing to raise funds for Bonnie Babies, they raised a total of £230. Ladies' captain Valerie MacKay thanked everyone who helped over the course of the day. Played in a Stableford format, the competition was won by Mary MacIntyre, third from the right, and the scratch winner was Lindsay Ramsay, third from the left. They are pictured with the rest of the main prize-winners.
In 2011: Machrihanish Golf Club's ladies competed in their annual Ladies Charity Open. Playing to raise funds for Bonnie Babies, they raised a total of £230. Ladies' captain Valerie MacKay thanked everyone who helped over the course of the day. Played in a Stableford format, the competition was won by Mary MacIntyre, third from the right, and the scratch winner was Lindsay Ramsay, third from the left. They are pictured with the rest of the main prize-winners.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday June 17 2011

Methadone clinic a done deal?

There are fears that plans for a methadone treatment clinic in Campbeltown will go ahead regardless of opposition.

Campbeltown Community Council invited experts and the public to join them at their June meeting on Monday in the town hall for a debate.

The town’s GPs have opposed setting up a joint-venture service to prescribe the heroin substitute; one fear is it will attract more drug users into town.

Dr Malcolm Lazarus said he was not convinced it was the most appropriate treatment.

‘No-one has a solution to the problem but clinics are a Scottish Government objective; I don’t know if there’s anything we can do to stop this happening whether we want it or not.’

Addicts would receive their daily methadone dose in a chemist’s shop supervised by a pharmacist and allowed to take away one dose on Saturday for Sunday.

Three GPs and addiction nurses would run a weekly clinic at the hospital, covering as far as Whitehouse.

The programme would be part of the alcohol and drug partnership and link up with successful existing ventures such as Kintyre Alcohol and Drugs Advisory Service; NHS, council, KADAS pharmacy and all partners working together.

It is difficult to estimate the number of addicts in Kintyre; it is believed to be at least 20 to 30. About a third of those who take part in the treatment are successful.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday June 14 1996

Secret talks on Irish ferry

All parties involved in the Northern Ireland ferry project were earlier this week remaining tight-lipped about the possibility of a private operator becoming involved.

At the moment government-owned Caledonian MacBrayne is the only operator publicly linked with the project.

But CalMac needs Scottish Office approval to add the service to the routes it already operates on the west coast of Scotland.

CalMac has made no secret of its interest in the project and had identified a suitable vessel for the service.

But now it has emerged that talks are going on regarding the possibility of a privately-owned operator chartering a vessel from CalMac to run the service.

The operator is not being named, but Seacat was at one time interested in the service. The firm already operates a high-speed link between Stranraer and Belfast.

But Argyll and the Isles Enterprise and Moyle District Council, the driving forces behind the project, were more impressed by CalMac’s proposals for the service.

CalMac was the only firm to submit a firm bid to run the service.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday June 17 1971

Fifty years of the Conventicle

This year’s Columba Conventicle will take place as usual at the site of the footsteps of the famous missionary at Southend.

It is, however, of special importance.

Because it was 50 years ago that the first service was preached by the late Rev Angus MacVicar, affectionately known in later years as ‘The Padre’.

And on Sunday, the Padre’s Son, the Rev Kenneth MacVicar, will be taking the service, which will be held in the evening.

Car park grievance

The new car park at Burnside Street had, according to many townspeople, been laid out very well with its surrounding flower bed.

Yet this was not the view of many drivers in the town.

They have been complaining about the giant heap of earth centred in the car park.

One driver said: ‘That heap of earth has been there for about two months, even before the workmen started to build the border for the flowers, and now it’s getting worse.’

The chief complaint was that the earth had been blocking many drivers from getting in or out.

Another driver said that some motorists were making things worse in the park, by discourteous parking of the cars.

In reply to these complaints, a burgh spokesman said: ‘The park is under construction and the drivers should have the courtesy not to use it until it is completed.’

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday June 18 1921

Columba celebration at Southend

It is an appropriate circumstance that the 1,400th anniversary of the birth of Saint Columba, which falls upon the present here, should have had its first public celebration in Kintyre, for by a well-founded local tradition it has been established that near the southern end of the peninsula, Columba, while on his way from Ireland to the Isle of Iona, first set foot on Scottish soil, thereby associating with this district a name that has been made our native shire renowned forever in the annals of the church.

The celebration took place at Southend on Wednesday afternoon, the 8th inst, it was promoted by the Established Presbytery of Kintyre, and the proceedings were in every way worthy of the interesting and historic occasion.

The service was held in the open air on the knowe to the west of the old churchyard of Keil-Colm-Keil, which is the traditional sight of the first Columban church in Kintyre, and on which stands the sandal-marked rock locally known as Saint Columba’s footprints.

The weather, which was rather dull and unpromising in the morning, broke out into glorious sunshine in the afternoon and, but for a stiff westerly breeze, the conditions were very favourable.

Interest in the occasion was widespread and the congregation that assembled was very large, many travelling considerable distances to participate.

There was a large representation of people from Campbeltown, and the congregation, hard by the shore, made a memorable and impressive sight.

This service was shared in by representatives of the Presbyterian and Episcopal churches of the district, while the praise was led by a choir conducted by Mr JM Brown.