From Our Files, June 11 2021

In 2011: Captain David Allen, centre, with Harbour Master Stephen Scally, left, and assistant David Martin; all three used to work on fishing vessels in Campbeltown together.
In 2011: Captain David Allen, centre, with Harbour Master Stephen Scally, left, and assistant David Martin; all three used to work on fishing vessels in Campbeltown together.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday June 10 2011

David finally gets to walk to work

History was made last week when a Campbeltonian sailed the biggest Caledonian MacBrayne ship to visit the town into the port.

David Allen brought MV Isle of Arran to dock at the ferry terminal in Campbeltown and said it was the first time he has been able to walk to work since he started with CalMac 20 years ago.

What made this journey more significant is that normally ships over 80 metres need to have a pilot to bring a ship in.

At 84 metres in length, Harbour Master Stephen Scally was confident David could do the job himself.

The ship normally covers the Kennacraig to Islay route and is in Campbeltown on standby.

She is due to stay in the harbour until June 12 unless called away before then. She will then go back onto the Islay route to cover for MV Hebridean Isles, while she is in dry dock.

David previously sailed into Campbeltown as second mate on the MV Claymore.

He said that the time spent in Campbeltown would give him and his crew time to tidy up MV Isle of Arran and carry out maintenance.

‘It is a proud moment taking this ship in to your own town,’ said David.

Harbour Master Scally said he couldn’t remember anyone bringing a ship of this size into Campbeltown before.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday June 7 1996

Stamp book shelved for last time

Saddell sub-postmistress Nan Miller put her stamp book away for the last time on Friday after 35 years behind a Post Office counter.

Mrs Miller, 66, began her career with the Post Office in 1960 following the death of the village’s previous sub-postmaster Archie Livingston.

She had moved to Saddell four years before with her late husband William, who was a keeper with the Forestry Commission.

Mrs Miller said: ‘I have very much enjoyed my time behind the counter and obviously have got to know everyone from the village and many others outside it.’

She was presented with a garden parasol and television on behalf of Post Office Counters by local retail network manager Irene Boyd.

Mrs Boyd said: ‘We’d like to thank Nan for the service she has provided at Saddell and wish her all the best in the future.

‘We particularly appreciate her staying on while we tried to find a replacement for her.’

Earlier this week the Post Office was still looking for someone to take over from Mrs Miller.

Anyone interested can contact Post Office Counters Recruitment, 8 Nelson Mandela Place, Glasgow.

RAF housing talks

Argyll and Bute District Council is due to hold talks with the Ministry of Defence and the Scottish Office later this month over the future of around 100 houses at the RAF’s former base at Machrihanish.

The council has expressed an interest in taking over the houses.

Recently, the RAF agreed to lease 400 houses it owns near Elgin to Moray Council.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday June 10 1971

‘Wages too much’ – so band missed show

Everything went with a swing at Friday’s June show organised by Kintyre Agricultural Society but there was one familiar ‘swing’ missing from the Anderston Park Showfield – the Ceannloch Pipe Band.

And this week the Courier has been inundated with enquiries asking about the band’s mysterious non-appearance.

The answer, according to a band official, is quite simple. The society refused to pay the wages of band members who would have lost a day’s work through being present at the show.

The band, of course, was always a popular attraction on the show day.

Band secretary Mr William McCallum, a local butcher, said yesterday that the society felt that the wage bill was too high.

It is understood that the society would have to pay the band in the region of £40 to cover the pipers’ and drummers’ expenses.

Added Mr McCallum: ‘The band never made any profit from the show, only enough to pay the members’ wages.’

The society’s president, Mr Robert Millar, of Auchaleek Farm, said that the band’s performance last year was not satisfactory at the show because they only played a few tunes.

Mr Millar said that last year the band played quite a selection on the way to the show ground from the steamer, but this was not the responsibility of the society.

He said that at a meeting of the society directors recently, a unanimous decision not to invite the band to the show was arrived at.

He added that the band always received free luncheons and free drink on the day of the show.

In 1971: Clochkeil farmers J and M Barr once again stole the show at Kintyre Agricultural Society's annual big day out at Anderston Park, Campbeltown. On a day blessed with uninterrupted sunshine, their prizewinning Ayrshire cow won the premier award in the cattle section, the Overhead Ayrshire Championship. The Barrs also won many other trophies and awards for their cattle.
In 1971: Clochkeil farmers J and M Barr once again stole the show at Kintyre Agricultural Society’s annual big day out at Anderston Park, Campbeltown. On a day blessed with uninterrupted sunshine, their prizewinning Ayrshire cow won the premier award in the cattle section, the Overhead Ayrshire Championship. The Barrs also won many other trophies and awards for their cattle.

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday June 11 1921

Kintyre live stock show

Editor’s note: The following article contains Latin abbreviations no longer in common use: viz, videlicet, meaning ‘that is to say’; and inst, instante mense, referring to the current month.

The annual live stock show of the Kintyre Agricultural Society, held in the Showfield, Castleacres, on Friday third inst. proved eminently successful, and in respect of drawings and attendance provided an agreeable surprise to the directors, who were prepared, looking to the unprecedented conditions prevailing in connection with transport facilities to and from the town, for a decided drop in the gate drawings.

To the happy result which crowned the proceedings of the day there were two main contributing factors, viz., a particularly fine entry in all sections of the show and lively competition in several classes which attracted uncommon interest amongst the general public; and, secondly, weather conditions of a kind that could not have been bettered for an open air event.

The day was one of glorious sunshine, and the attraction of the showfield was one that must have been almost irresistible to anyone having even the slightest interest in the great annual agricultural event of the Kintyre peninsula.

Many people travelled far to attend the show. There was a great influx of motorcars to the town and, by good fortune, the Campbeltown and Glasgow Steamboat Company were able to arrange sailings which proved of great convenience to many, especially judges and dealers, who were able to travel by sea on the inward journey on Thursday and return on Saturday morning.

The judging rings were surrounded by eager and interested crowds from the early forenoon, and the keenness displayed in all the events never showed any sign of waning although the time table fell considerably behind towards the afternoon owing to the very big entries in the Clydesdale classes and the uniformly good quality of the stock.