From Our Files, April 30 2021

In 1996: Major Hamish Clark presented George McIntyre, centre, with a quaich for his composition of a march to commemorate the Battle of Longstop Hill, photographed with Major Duncan McMillan, who won the Military Medal at the battle.
In 1996: Major Hamish Clark presented George McIntyre, centre, with a quaich for his composition of a march to commemorate the Battle of Longstop Hill, photographed with Major Duncan McMillan, who won the Military Medal at the battle.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday April 29 2011

‘Swept under the carpet’

Bus services across Kintyre are being slashed as Argyll and Bute Council desperately tries to save money.

Community groups like the Red Cross will see their funding cut back as nearly £500,000 goes from the council’s discretionary transport funding which covers rural and community routes as well as some ferries.

More than 30 rural services across Argyll and Bute will go while many others will operate a reduced service from today.

The decision to slash the services was taken by the 16-member executive committee of the council last week; a move condemned by Kintyre’s Councillor Donald Kelly.

The Argyll First councillor said: ‘This decision should have been brought before the whole council. A big decision has been swept under the carpet.’

The budget was reduced by £451,035, from £726,035 to £275,000.

Douglas Hendry, executive director of customer services, said: ‘Our process is not to fund routes where there is alternative transport available or where there are less than 2,000 people travelling annually.’

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday April 26 1996

Piper’s march wins prize

The Campbeltown piper who won a competition to compose a tune to mark a battle in which many of his comrades fought was presented with his prize on Tuesday – the battle’s 53rd anniversary.

Mr George McIntyre from Meadowburn won a competition run by the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to compose a 6/8 march in memory of the Battle of Longstop Hill in 1943.

On Tuesday, Longstop Day, Major Hamish Clark (ret’d) of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders travelled to Campbeltown to present George with a specially engraved quaich at a ceremony at the Argyll Hotel.

Many Kintyre men fought at the battle which was one of the decisive moments in the Second World War against the Germans in North Africa.

Major Duncan McMillan, who won the Military Medal at the battle, attended the ceremony along with many of George’s other old army friends.

Before he handed the quaich to George, Major Clark said: ‘I really can’t think of anyone more appropriate to have won the competition than George McIntyre himself.

‘If George had not been taken prisoner in 1940 he may well have fought at Longstop.’

Receiving the quaich, George said: ‘It gives me great honour to achieve this.’

Then Mr Ian McKerral from Kintyre and District Pipe Band gave the first public performance of the tune.

In 1996: Major Hamish Clark presented George McIntyre, centre, with a quaich for his composition of a march to commemorate the Battle of Longstop Hill, photographed with Major Duncan McMillan, who won the Military Medal at the battle.
In 1996: Major Hamish Clark presented George McIntyre, centre, with a quaich for his composition of a march to commemorate the Battle of Longstop Hill, photographed with Major Duncan McMillan, who won the Military Medal at the battle.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday April 29 1971

The end of the road for Paul

Paul McCartney, who is at the moment staying at High Park Farm, Campbeltown, has just made one giant step forward towards severing all his connections with the other three Beatles.

John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr abandoned their appeal against a High Court order on Monday, putting the affairs of their company, Apple, in the hands of a receiver. The three now face a legal costs bill estimated at £100,000.

Mr Morris Finer, QC for John, George, Ringo and Apple, told the appeal court on Monday that they now considered it was in the common interest to explore ways of allowing Paul to free himself from the partnership by agreement.

Mr David Hurst QC on behalf of Paul said: ‘He will most willingly enter into the proposed negotiations to achieve his freedom from the partnership by consent rather than by court action.’

Well, it looks very much like the end of the ‘long and winding road’ to quote a well known McCartney ballad.

What does Paul himself feel about the rise and fall of the Beatles?

Two Courier men drove up to High Park Farm — which has a long and decidedly bumpy road leading to it — to find out what the man in the centre of it all felt about things.

Apart from being obviously excited about his latest and most important success, Paul did not like saying anything about the matter.

Though very polite and friendly, he made it quite clear that he does not see any point in giving interviews or saying anything remotely sensational.

After ten years of being harried and hustled by journalists and photographers; never having a minute’s peace to himself; always having been the centre of attraction; never having been able to pop in to the ‘local’, is it any wonder that Paul is determined to live as quietly as possible?

He seemed as happy as a sand-boy, out there in the wilds.

When we approached him, he had obviously been brushing down one of his horses because he still held a horse brush in his hand.

His wife Linda looked the essence of happiness as her golden hair mirrored the warm sunshine. The children yelled and gurgled contentedly and even Martha, the English sheepdog, seemed happy.

The farm house itself has been extensively renovated, a new roof having been constructed and the farm work appears to be progressing normally.

Paul himself has changed. Outwardly at any rate. Gone is the Beatle mop, the style which was copied the whole word over. Gone is the boyish grin, which once sent screaming thousands into ecstasy.

What has taken the place of these characteristics? Paul now sports a beard; the hair remains longish but it is brushed back, revealing the full extent of his forehead; the smile is no longer boyish.

The former bass-guitarist/song-writer with the most influential and certainly most famous foursome the world has ever known has changed.

Paul will probably continue to compose such brilliant songs as Maybe I’m Amazed and Another Day; but to millions of people, from Campbeltown to Honolulu, pop music will certainly never be the same again.

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday April 30 1921

Sparks and flashes

There would be some fluttering this week among the ladies in the town who are liable to serve on a jury, summonses to appear on the occasion of a forthcoming jury trial having been issued to 24 ladies and 24 gentlemen. These are first jury summonses issued to women in this district.

***

The 8th Argylls Defence Battalion, raised in connection with the present emergency, is encamped near Bridge of Allan.

***

The customary assemblies which mark the close of Mr J B M’Ewen’s dancing classes will be held in the Town Hall on Friday May 6.

***

A generous gentleman who has a business connection with the town and country has given the Governor of Campbeltown Poorhouse £2 to be expended in tobacco for the smokers and tea and sugar for the others in the Institution.

***

The contract for the daily motor mail service between Campbeltown and Tarbert — the existing one expires in July — has been secured by Mr A M M’Conachie, Low Dunashery, Tayinloan.