Tributes paid after Prince Philip dies aged 99

Prince Philip shakes hands with Campbeltown Provost Archibald Keith during the royal visit in 1958.
Prince Philip shakes hands with Provost Archibald Keith during the royal visit to Campbeltown in 1958.

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The Union Flag has been flying at half mast at the head of Campbeltown’s Old Quay this week following the death of Prince Philip, aged 99, last Friday.

At about midday on April 9, Buckingham Palace announced the Duke of Edinburgh had passed away peacefully that morning at Windsor Castle.

The Union Flag at the head of Campbeltown's Old Quay has been flown at half mast since news of Prince Philip's death was announced.
The Union Flag at the head of Campbeltown’s Old Quay has been flown at half mast since news of Prince Philip’s death was announced.

Argyll and Bute’s provost Councillor David Kinniburgh said: ‘It is with sadness that we learned about the death of HRH Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh.

‘The Duke of Edinburgh gave decades of service to Great Britain. He leaves a tremendous legacy through his Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme which has benefited the lives of so many young people. His loss will be felt by many. We send our sincere condolences to Her Majesty the Queen and his family at this sad time.’

Jane MacLeod, Lord Lieutenant of Argyll and Bute, said: ‘My thoughts and prayers are with Her Majesty the Queen and her family as they mourn the passing of HRH Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh – a much-loved husband, father and grandfather as well as a man who dedicated so many decades of his life to public service.

‘He will be sorely missed and I send my condolences and deepest sympathy to the Royal Family at this very sad time.’

The Duke of Edinburgh’s death has prompted many to recall his visits to Campbeltown.

In 1958, Prince Philip and his wife, Queen Elizabeth II, stopped at Campbeltown on their way to Balmoral on the Royal Yacht Britannia.

The royals were welcomed to the town by local dignitaries including town provost Archibald Keith whose daughter, Maureen Bell, later presented flowers to the Queen.

Prince Philip shakes hands with Campbeltown Provost Archibald Keith during the royal visit in 1958.
Prince Philip shakes hands with Campbeltown Provost Archibald Keith during the royal visit in 1958.

Mrs Bell, a retired teacher, was 19 years old at the time and remembers the day well – although she missed most of the fanfare surrounding the couple’s arrival as she was at the town hall being coached on the proper etiquette for meeting the Queen.

In 1971, the Duke had been to sea on the nuclear submarine HMS Churchill before landing in Campbeltown where he took time to meet members of Campbeltown Sea Cadet Unit and staff at the town’s oil fuel depot.

Prince Philip takes the salute at Campbeltown Sea Cadets. The cadets are from left: William Craig, Graham Anderson, Roy McLellan, Brian Dewar, Ivor Watson, Stuart Anderson and behind the unit commander Jones.
Prince Philip takes the salute at Campbeltown Sea Cadets. The cadets are from left: William Craig, Graham Anderson, Roy McLellan, Brian Dewar, Ivor Watson, Stuart Anderson and behind the unit commander Jones.

Prince Philip’s funeral will take place on Saturday, with only 30 mourners present, in line with current government guidance on life events. The Royal Family has asked that members of the public consider making a donation to a charity instead of leaving floral tributes in his memory.

For those wishing to pay tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh, an online book of condolence is available on the Argyll and Bute Council website.

Prince Philip greeting staff and local figures at Campbeltown's oil fuel depot. Thomas Mason, who supplied the photograph and was jetty supervisor, can be seen in the background, to the left of the prince.
Prince Philip greeting staff and local figures at Campbeltown’s oil fuel depot. Thomas Mason, who supplied the photograph and was jetty supervisor, can be seen in the background, to the left of the prince.