From Our Files, April 9 2021

In 2011: A delegation from Caledonian MacBrayne and Caledonian Maritime Assets Limited visited the Remontowa Shipyard in Gdansk, Poland, to oversee the final stages of construction of the new state-of-the-art ferry to be handed over to CalMac on May 2 for the Islay service. From left: Andrew Flockhart, CMAL business planning manager; Scott Ure, CalMac senior technical manager; Gordon Haig, chief engineer; Roddy MacLeod, ship’s Master; Drew Collier, CalMac’s retail manager and David Cannon, public affairs manager.
2011: A delegation from Caledonian MacBrayne and Caledonian Maritime Assets Ltd visited the Remontowa Shipyard in Gdansk Poland, to over see the final stages of construction of the new state-of-the-art ferry to be handed over to CalMac on May 2 for the Islay service. From left: Andrew Flockhart, CMAL business planning manager; Scott Ure, CalMac senor technical manager; Gordon Haig, chief engineer; Roddy MacLeod, ship’s Master; Drew Collier, CalMac’s retail manager and David Cannon, public affairs manager.

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1971: Popular bus driver/conductor Calum Kerr, of Ardrishaig, winds up the destination indicator
on the Lochgilphead to Campbeltown bus for the last time. Western SMT has taken over the bus run
between Lochgilphead and Tarbert. NO_C14_FromOurFiles_BusDriverCalumKerr-scaled.jpg

TEN YEARS AGO
Friday April 8 2011

Cops get tough on drugs menace

Campbeltown Police are getting tough on drugs and now have a team dedicated to tackling the use and supply of illegal substances in the town and Kintyre.

And their efforts are producing positive results.

In recent weeks The Courier has reported a number of houses searched under warrant by officers, on one occasion two houses simultaneously. As a result, a number of people have been reported to the procurator fiscal.

This week, once again, the team has been in action. A property in Campbeltown town centre was searched under warrant and a 41-year-old man and a 23-year-old woman reported to the procurator fiscal.

Inspector Tom Harper told The Courier: ‘Recent changes in our shift pattern for officers’ work hours to make them more efficient have enabled us to use our resources to create a small pro-active team which is concentrating on drug abuse in the town.

‘And we have had good and sufficient intelligence for four drugs search warrants to be executed in recent weeks.’

As a result of that, two people have been reported for being concerned in the supply of drugs and the other two were for drug possession.

This will continue for the foreseeable future as drug use and drug dealing has been identified as one of the greatest concerns in the community.

This month, Strathclyde Police is to consult with the public on its community policing plan for the coming year. The top four concerns for Kintyre and the islands of Gigha, Jura and Islay, as well as drugs, are: anti-social behaviour, assault, violent crime and speeding motorists.

TWENTY FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday April 5 1996

Bid to protect Sanda birds

Three Kintyre islands have been designated a conservation area in a bid to halt the decline of a species of seabird.

Sanda and its surrounding islands of Sheep and Glunimore have been named as a Site of Special Scientific Interest by Scottish National Heritage (SNH) as a result of the high level of shags which breed on the small group of islands.

Nationally important birds such as razorbill, cormorant and puffin also breed on the islands which form the most southerly breeding area in the British Isles for the storm petrel and Manx shearwater.

The islands are owned by Dick Gannon and his wife Meg, both of whom live in Campbeltown. The couple are glad the wildlife to be found on and around the islands had been formally recognised.

Meg Gannon said: ‘The wildlife on the islands has always been a great delight to us and we take its conservation seriously in all that we do on Sanda.

‘The recognition by SNH that the islands are worthy of scientific designation is most welcome at this time.’

Dick Gannon added: ‘We are very pleased. We have always had a green attitude on the island.’

The Gannons are currently refurbishing all of the island’s properties into self-catering houses.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
ThursdayApril 8 1971

Americans interested in Campbeltown

The results of a small advertising spree in the USA, which cost Campbeltown Town Council £50, were made known at the council’s finance committee meeting on Monday evening.

Town clerk Mr William Wilson reported he had received four replies, from industrialists and one from a real estate agent.

One firm, from Florida, claims to be the makers of the word’s finest rear view traffic mirrors. Another firm was involved in the plastics industry.

Mr Wilson raised a laugh when he said the real estate agent wanted to ‘sell’ Campbeltown.

On a more serious vein, Councillor Dan Black said he thought the £50 was a worthwhile investment and considered it should be spent in a similar manner annually.

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday April 9 1921

The mining crisis

Once again, the country has been plunged into industrial chaos by a national strike of miners.

One of the most calamitous results of the great coal strike last autumn was the loss to the British coal trade of the continental market.

The immediate and inevitable result must be a rise in the cost of living, because the food which was paid for by coal must now be bought in some other way, while the ships which used to sail from these shores laden with coal must now sail in ballast and make all their profits upon the homeward voyage.

But it need scarcely be pointed out that the greatest sufferers have been the miners themselves, who have been condemned by the misguided policy of their leaders to severe and increasing unemployment.

In these circumstances, the action which the Miners’ Executive has seen fit to take in calling a second strike is the more suicidal, since they have the lessons of the past three months vividly before their eyes.

The first evidence that once again the miners are signing their own death warrant is already to hand.

One of the largest firms of coal merchants in this country received, on the eve of the strike, news from New York that the American Coal Exchange was already flooded with inquiries from continental countries.

Now that the strike has been declared, these inquiries must inevitably result in contracts stretching in all probability over a period of years.

The result will be that however the contest is decided, and however hard the miners may subsequently be pleased to work and however cheap the price at which British coal is offered on the market, practically the entire field will already be occupied by foreign competitors and the British export market for coal will be seriously, and perhaps fatally, narrowed.

The effect of that must be a corresponding rise in the cost of living and delay in that fall in the cost of production which alone can win back for this country its supremacy of the markets of the world.