From Our Files, April 2 2021

In 1921: 'Any customer can have a car painted any colour that he wants, so long as it's black,' said Henry Ford. The princely sum of £240 would get you a brand new Ford Touring car from the Ford works in Trafford Park, Manchester, through the Argyllshire Motor Company, on Argyll Street, where Ramsay Place stands today.
In 1921: 'Any customer can have a car painted any colour that he wants, so long as it's black,' said Henry Ford. The princely sum of £240 would get you a brand new Ford Touring car from the Ford works in Trafford Park, Manchester, through the Argyllshire Motor Company, on Argyll Street, where Ramsay Place stands today.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday April 1 2011

Yacht’s lucky escape after running aground off Gigha

A yacht had a lucky escape after it ran aground near to Gigha on Sunday.

The Fairmaid’s two crew alerted Clyde Coastguard at 12.54pm on March 27 after she hit something.

Those on board weren’t sure what it was or how much damage had been caused.

Fishing vessel Capella, which was in the vicinity, had divers onboard and after Fairmaid came off the grounding and made her way into Ardminish Bay, Gigha, one of the divers went down to have a look.

Thankfully there was no damage to her hull but she stayed in the bay overnight.

Gigha coastguard was alerted to the call and kept an eye on the boat as she came into the bay.

Islay coastguard was also alerted just as the boat came off the grounding as the crew were unsure whether they would go to Ardfern Bay, but decided to remain in Ardminish.

In 2011: Campbeltown has Irish ferries once again with the launch of passenger services to Troon and Ballycastle by Kintyre Express, a division of West Coast Motors. Jennifer Craig names Kintyre Express II with the liberal application of champagne.
In 2011: Campbeltown has Irish ferries once again with the launch of passenger services to Troon and Ballycastle by Kintyre Express, a division of West Coast Motors. Jennifer Craig names Kintyre Express II with the liberal application of champagne.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday March 29 1996

Kintyre farmers look set to call for goose scheme

Kintyre farmers look set to call for a compensation scheme for damage done by rare Greenland white-fronted geese.

A compensation scheme already exists on Islay.

Last year, farmers on Islay received an average pay-out of around £1,700 to compensate for damage done by the geese.

The geese are a protected species and there are only 27,000 of them in the world.

A joint survey by Scottish Natural Heritage and the Kintyre branch of the National Farmers Union of Scotland revealed the geese were becoming more of a problem for farmers.

The survey, based on farms in the Laggan and Tayinloan areas during the winter of 1994-5 revealed that goose numbers had risen to around 2,500. In 1984-5 the figure was closer to 1,400.

It is said that damaged varied from ‘localised root pulling’ to heavy grazing of root crops and pasture.

Geese were also blamed for creating large puddles.

The report suggests that one reason for geese becoming an increasing problem was the fact that they were being attracted by improved grazing work done by the farmers.

The president of the Kintyre branch of the NFUS, Rory Collville, said the survey backed the case for a compensation scheme.

The branch is due to discuss the survey next month.

He told the Courier: ‘Two-and-a-half-thousand birds may not sound like much.

‘But if you were a farmer with that number in your field you’d want compensation for the damage they cause. Where they are a problem, they are a serious problem.’

Lighthouse keepers leave

The last keepers will leave the Mull of Kintyre lighthouse this weekend when the lighthouse is officially automated.

The lighthouse, which has shone out over the North Channel since 1788, will be de-manned on Sunday.

It has taken two years’ work to automate the lighthouse. The new automatic light came into operation last week.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday April 1 1971

Aircraft firm moves into Campbeltown

The advance factory at Drumore Industrial Estate, built for the Department of Trade and Industry by Scottish Industrial Enterprises Corporation, has now been allocated to a small company – Aero Technicians Ltd.

They are experienced in servicing aircraft components and instruments and wish to extend their business from the present headquarters at Glasgow Airport to the Campbeltown factory.

Preparatory work is now taking place in the factory and it is hoped that a small pilot operation will be started in April.

During the very early stages, fully trained technicians only will be working in the factory but it is sincerely hoped that there will be a gradual build up of work on aircraft components over the next year or two which will enable the company to offer jobs to people living in the Campbeltown area.

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday April 2 1921

Sparks and flashes

Mr J B M’Ewen opens his annual session of dancing classes in the Town Hall on Monday.

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Summer Time comes into force on Sunday. Before retiring to rest on Saturday night the ‘nock’ should be put forward an hour.

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An evening service will be held in the Free Church on Sunday when a missionary address will be given by the Rev Alexander Dewar, South Africa.

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Lorne Street UF Church choir are giving a concert in Drumlemble Mission Hall on Thursday evening, 7th April. The proceeds are in aid of the hall funds.

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The sale of work organised by the Dorchas Society of Lochend UF Church, and held in the Church Hall on Wednesday, in aid of Foreign Missions, realised the fine sum of £145.

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The local schools re-open on Tuesday after the Easter vacation, and parents and guardians should note that classes for beginners will then be formed, enrolments being made on that day.

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Glasgow Spring Holiday of 1921 will be remembered as the ‘great wash-out’, but the memory will not in the slightest degree temper the happy anticipations of city folks of the Spring Holiday of 1922 when the time comes round again.

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An Commun Gaidhealach is showing a friendly interest in the Campbeltown Highland Gathering, which comes off on the 8th inst. Mr Neil Shaw, the organising secretary, is coming here for the event, and in the singing competition will judge the Gaelic language.

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Old comrades of the 8th Argylls are organising a farewell benefit concert to CSM J M’Murchy, DCM MM who has decided to try his luck in Australia. The concert will be held in the Victoria Hall on Saturday evening on the 9th and all who know the gallant ‘Jock’ will wish the project the best success.

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Operations for salving the gold bullion lying where the armed liner Laurentic sank off the north-west of Ireland in 1917 will soon be resumed. Some of the treasure was recovered last year, but unlike the grog which was salved in Kintyre shortly since, none of the yellow stuff has come ashore on the West Coast of Scotland so far.