From Our Files, February 26 2021

In 1971: Our picture shows the three young ladies adjudged the most beautiful in the Victoria Hall, Campbeltown, on Friday evening. They were competing in the local eliminating heat of Miss Highlands and Islands beauty competition. They are, left to right, Miss Muriel Coutts; Miss Maureen Maguire, the winner, and Miss Kathleen Longmuir.
In 1971: Our picture shows the three young ladies adjudged the most beautiful in the Victoria Hall, Campbeltown, on Friday evening. They were competing in the local eliminating heat of Miss Highlands and Islands beauty competition. They are, left to right, Miss Muriel Coutts; Miss Maureen Maguire, the winner, and Miss Kathleen Longmuir.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday February 25 2011

Minister’s hope for Skykon

The administrator at Skykon has praised the hard work and dedication at the Kintyre factory which now has funds until the beginning of March.

The Secretary of State for Scotland, Michael Moore MP, visited the wind turbine tower manufacturer on Tuesday with Alan Reid MP for Argyll and Bute.

Skykon was placed into administration after its Danish parent company filed for bankruptcy. The politicians met Andrew Davidson of Ernst and Young, administrators, and David Steele, factory manager in private.

‘Very useful albeit in difficult circumstances,’ was Mr Moore’s verdict. ‘I hope the administration and management team will be able to work their way through it and Alan Reid will be taking away a number of points to discuss with the Scottish government and others.’

Mr Reid added: ‘With a modern factory, a skilled, committed workforce and the demand for wind energy, it must be possible to find a company willing to take over the site.’

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday February 23 1996

Hotel jobs boost for the area

A Glasgow company has announced it is to undertake a £2 million refit of the semi-derelict Keil Hotel at Southend.

Key Leisure wants to turn the art deco building into a four-star hotel and country club.

The hotel has been standing empty since 1990 and is believed to be in a poor state of repair. The company hopes to have the hotel open by mid summer.

Key Leisure is part of the Premier Cuisine group which owns several pubs and hotels in the west of Scotland, including the Ingledene Hotel at Ardrossan.

The hotel is to be called the Mull of Kintyre Hotel and Country Club. It will have 24 en-suite bedrooms and a leisure facility including a swimming pool, training room and sauna. Once it opens the development is expected to create 47 jobs.

Mr Brian Morton, managing director of Premier Cuisine, said: ‘The group feels there is a lot of potential in the Campbeltown area for a hotel and country club of this standard.’

He added the local golf courses would prove an attraction for visitors from North America and Europe.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday February 25 1971

Editor’s note: The following article and this week’s photograph are used in historical context and should not be considered the view of today’s Campbeltown Courier. This was, unbelievably, the front page lead story 50 years ago.

Hot pants… they are selling like hot cakes

The cries of despondency from the men of the world rang high when the midi and the maxi skirt looked like taking over from the miniskirt.

For the past few ecstatic years, males in Campbeltown had been able to ogle at the lithe legs of the females and the thought of these lovely legs being covered abhorred these gentlemen.

However, there is still hope for the leg brigade. Hot pants, it seems, are selling like hot cakes and it already looks like being a short summer!

In Campbeltown, the shorts are selling well, especially among girls in their late teens.

Most of the girls are buying them for wearing to dances – runner-up to Miss Campbeltown was wearing a pair of shorts – but already one or two have been spotted in the street during the day.

The shorts cost, on average, about £1.75 and are made from a variety of materials including denim, silk and wool. Shorts by themselves are going well but the bib type is selling best. The pants are also being worn with midi dresses and maxi coats thus giving the girls the best of both worlds. Popular colours are purple, black and red.

Local drapers expect a big demand for the hot-pants in the summer and are stocking up accordingly.

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday February 26 1921

Mishap to SS Kinloch

The steamer Kinloch met with a mishap on the outward passage from Campbeltown on Monday, but fortunately it did not prove of a serious nature.

When the steamer was approaching Lochranza, and was quite near to the pier, the eccentric shaft gave way, and the vessel had to drop anchor. The weather conditions were good.

A telegram was dispatched for the services of a tug, and as the delay at the outset was likely to be considerable, a large number of the passengers landed and proceeded overland to Lamlash, where they caught a boat for the mainland.

After a bit, the engineers were successful in effecting a temporary repair, and the Kinloch was able to resume the journey under her own steam.

There was no interruption in the service on account of the accident, the necessary repair being completed in time to enable her to take up the inward run next day.