From our Files, November 13 2020

The 'wanted' column in the Courier was the place in 1920 to get anything from a farm hand who was good with drains to a house for a week for Glasgow Fair. Employers could stipulate the marital status of their workers - was it because there would be casual work for a wife and children or was it that they didn’t want wild young ploughboys who would go out and get drunk?

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday November 12, 2010

Skykon: talks continue to save plant

Intensive discussions are taking place between Scottish Development International, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and Skykon Group to save the Campbeltown plant.

Jim Mather MSP for Argyll and Bute said the organisations were continuing to work with all parties ‘to try to achieve a positive outcome’.

‘The First Minister chaired a meeting with officials last Friday and ministers are committed to ensuring the base and its staff continue to play a crucial role in the development of clean, green energy technology and building Scotland’s low carbon economy,’ he said.

‘Campbeltown is but one element in the overall Skykon Group operations and is caught up in the current severe financial difficulties of the overall group.

‘A successful outcome will depend in large measure on the strength and solidarity of the recovery plan group management and shareholders put together to address the overall situation of the Skykon Group and within that the contribution they see Campbeltown making to the group’s balance sheet in the long-term.

‘For my part, I will continue to promote the location, the plant and its personnel and will be in Kintyre on Saturday to discuss this and the future with David Steel, factory manager.’

Alan Reid MP said there is clearly a huge demand for towers for wind turbines.

He said: ‘I hope Skykon can be rescued, but, if they can’t, Scottish Energy Minister Jim Mather must step in and ensure that another company takes over the Machrihanish development from Skykon. Many local jobs depend on this industry.’

TWENTY FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday November 17, 1995

Potential Wee Toon ‘bloodbath’ averted

Six police officers were left to quell what could have been a major riot between locals and sailors in Campbeltown Main Street, the town’s sheriff court heard.

Due to an apparent oversight by the Navy, the court was told, no shore patrol was provided, and in the early hours of a January morning, Campbeltown youths faced sailors across Main Street, taunting and gesticulating and challenging each other to fight… with the police in the middle.

There were about 300 in the area that night – not unusual for a Saturday night in Campbeltown, one policeman told the court.

But he said police were worried if the sailors took the locals up on the challenge the situation could very quickly get out of control: ‘I think if the Navy people had decided to have a go we’d have had a bloodbath,’ said PC Keith Kirkland.

He added that normally the Navy provided a shore patrol, but this time there wasn’t one.

‘There appears to have been an oversight,’ he said.

He added that most of the sailors were drunk, having to be supported by their colleagues.

Police Sergeant Robert McGarrie told the court there were six police on duty there at the time – including one Special Constable – and they, with some of the supervisors from ship, were trying to get their sailors back to their ship.

That night, 14 people were assaulted, three of them locals, the rest were Navy. Eleven were released from hospital without serious injury, but three – all of them Navy personnel – were detained with serious injuries.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday November 12, 1970

Awards to Sea Cadets who save a life

Two Campbeltown sea cadets have been awarded wrist watches by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution for their rescue in July of a 16-year-old boy whose canoe had overturned in Campbeltown Loch.

Ian Campbell, Cruachan, Low Askomill and Malcolm Stewart, Calton Avenue, both 14 years old, were on the beach at Dalintober when the alarm was raised. They quickly paddled out in a canoe to the 16ft sea cadet motor launch moored offshore.

They then steered the launch towards Duncan Haddow of 27 Davaar Avenue, who was drifting in choppy seas in his lifejacket, some distance from the capsized canoe. They pulled him on board.

A doctor who later examined Duncan said that if he had been in the water for five minutes more he would have been ‘gone’.

Duncan, who was an hour in the water before he was rescued, had been out in a canoe with a sail. It overturned, and he righted it but couldn’t climb into it. He was carried away from the canoe.

The president of the local branch of the RNLI, Mr AP MacGrory, yesterday presented the boys with an official letter from the association intimating that they would be presented at a future date with inscribed watches.

An RNLI spokesman said: ‘There is no doubt that the prompt action of Ian and Malcom saved the boy’s life.’

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday November 13, 1920

Argyll County Education Authority classes for dairymaids

The Education Authority are prepared to grant a limited number of Allowances of 30/- per week, plus travelling expenses, to Dairymaids desirous of taking a Special Four Weeks’ Winter Course in Dairying at the Kilmarnock Dairy School, commencing on Monday 10th January and on Monday 7th February respectively.

Forms of Application, which must be filled up and lodged with the undersigned, not later than 15th December, can be had on application.

D Smith, Clerk to the Authority, Dunoon.

CAPTION:

The ‘wanted’ column in the Courier was the place in 1920 to get anything from a farm hand who was good with drains to a house for a week for Glasgow Fair. Employers could stipulate the marital status of their workers – was it because there would be casual work for a wife and children or was it that they didn’t want wild young ploughboys who would go out and get drunk? NO_c46files01