Leader, October 30 2020

The site where the helicopter currently lands is often water-logged and muddy.

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Debt of thanks to Stuart McLellan

The whole Kintyre community owes a huge debt of thanks to Stuart McLellan for instigating the Campbeltown helipad project and securing the more than a quarter of a million pounds of funding required.

We can only imagine the amount of time and effort which has gone into the initial planning, liaising with the relevant organisations and putting together a comprehensive business case.

To do something like this for your own community would be incredible but to do it for a community more than 130 miles away from where you live, even although you have family connections, is outstanding.

While the project is still awaiting official planning permission, it looks likely to go ahead, and could be underway as early as the beginning of next year.

More than ever before, people appreciate their health and all those who help us look after it, from carers and medical staff here and at hospitals further afield, to all those who risk their lives to transport us between the two whether that’s by air or road.

It is fitting that this potentially life-saving facility is to be named in memory of Robert Black, who died after caring for others.

The helipad news is the kind that we love to share with Courier readers. It gives us something positive to look forward to as we end this year and enter a new one, and we cannot thank Stuart enough for his efforts in bringing the project to fruition.