Thought for the Week, September 11 2020

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When will churches open? This is a question many people are asking these days.

Church buildings have been closed for several months, but the actual church – the people who profess to follow Jesus – have still been ‘church’.

Some have followed online worship, some have prayed privately, some have found new ways to worship, but worship has never ceased and never will.

Some churches are opening their doors for corporate, but monitored worship.

Some churches are asking their members to attend by invitation.

Some churches are waiting till Phase 4 as they want to be extra cautious.

We are living in unprecedented times, globally, nationally and locally.

What will the future hold for us as ‘church’?

Christmas catalogues are now dropping into our post boxes.

I doubt if we will be singing Christmas carols in our churches on Christmas Eve.

I doubt we will be enjoying wonderful school Christmas concerts and nativity plays.

I hope I am wrong, but I fear we have a long journey ahead.

Who would have thought last year things would have changed so much?

What will Christmas be like if we are still in lockdown?

Will we be able to sit together in our own churches to welcome the Christ child on Christmas morning?

Maybe we will – who knows in these uncertain times.

A learned Christian scholar said that in these uncertain times, the question we should be asking is not ‘Why?’ but ‘What?’

What can we do? What does God ask of us? What will make a difference?

The answer is one we know well and when asked ‘What does God ask of us?’ the answer is always the same: ‘Act justly, love mercy and walk humbly with your God.’