From our Files, July 31 2020

Fifty years ago: The group is, from left to right: Mr Alasdair McMillan, on holiday in Campbeltown from Los Angeles, U.S.A., Mrs Patsy McMillan, South Africa; General Sir George MacMillan, clan chief, Mrs N.L. McMillan, Campbeltown and her son, Mr Neil McMillan from Ontario, Canada.
Fifty years ago: The group is, from left to right: Mr Alasdair McMillan, on holiday in Campbeltown from Los Angeles, U.S.A., Mrs Patsy McMillan, South Africa; General Sir George MacMillan, clan chief, Mrs N.L. McMillan, Campbeltown and her son, Mr Neil McMillan from Ontario, Canada.

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TEN YEARS AGO
Friday July 30, 2010

Village to fight offshore wind farm plans

People of Machrihanish turned out in force to a meeting on Wednesday and decided to form a group to fight plans for a massive wind farm in the waters off the coast of their village.

The meeting was swelled by others from across Kintyre, all concerned about the size, number and location of the turbines.

SSE Renewables is proposing 105 turbines over a 70 square km area, which would be 133m tall to the tip of the turbine blades.

‘Far bigger than the ones we are used to on land,’ said Judy Orr who was elected chairwoman of the group formed at the end of the evening. ‘Navigation and aviation lights will be needed. Even at night you’ll be able to see them.’

Only one person at the meeting spoke in favour of the plans.

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Friday August 4, 1995

Second RNLI rocket lands in town

Campbeltown Lifeboat is to change its rocket launching procedure after a second near miss in the town in two months.

A rocket fired when Campbeltown Lifeboat was launched last Wednesday evening, came down in Kinloch Green near a woman walking her dog.

In May, a lifeboat rocket came down in Dalintober Primary School’s playground only moments before it would have been packed with children.

In last Wednesday’s incident, Miss Mary MacKinlay was walking her sister’s dog in the park around 7pm when she saw the canister hit the ground near her.

Miss MacKinlay told the Courier: ‘I saw something tumbling. I got a terrible fright. They’re supposed to save lives, not endanger them.’

She continued along to her sister Margaret’s house in John Street but went out again 10 minutes to collect the canister.

In May, an identical object landed a few hundred yards away in Dalintober Primary School’s playground, minutes before the children were due out.

Campbeltown Lifeboat secretary Captain Gordon Black said he was surprised to hear another rocket had landed in the town.

He told the Courier: ‘My reaction is amazement. We thought we’d taken ample precautions after the last incident.’

But he added: ‘This has possibly happened before, but we didn’t realise it was happening as no-one reported it.’

Lifeboat maroons are fired out into Campbeltown Loch but after they explode the wind can bring the canister back in towards the town.

Captain Black rejected suggestions the maroon was faulty or had been fired wrongly. He added that in future the maroon would be shot further down the loch to cut the risk of it returning to the town.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
Thursday July 30, 1970

A group of MacMillans gathered in the Argyll Arms Hotel last week when a branch of the Clan MacMillan Society was founded. Fifty-one Kintyre McMillans attended.

Fifty years ago: The group is, from left to right: Mr Alasdair McMillan, on holiday in Campbeltown from Los Angeles, U.S.A., Mrs Patsy McMillan, South Africa; General Sir George MacMillan, clan chief, Mrs N.L. McMillan, Campbeltown and her son, Mr Neil McMillan from Ontario, Canada.
Fifty years ago: The group is, from left to right: Mr Alasdair McMillan, on holiday in Campbeltown from Los Angeles, U.S.A., Mrs Patsy McMillan, South Africa; General Sir George MacMillan, clan chief, Mrs N.L. McMillan, Campbeltown and her son, Mr Neil McMillan from Ontario, Canada.

ONE-HUNDRED YEARS AGO
Saturday July 31, 1920

Loans to ex-service fishermen

In the annual report of the Fishery Board for Scotland, just published, the following statement is made with regard to the scheme for issuing loans to ex-service fishermen for the purchase of motor fishing boats: ‘Very soon after the conclusion of the Armistice, appeals for assistance to enable demobilised fishermen to resume their occupation were made. These appeals were based on the grounds that owing to the deterioration of boats which had necessarily had to be left unattended during their owners’ absence on service, the shortage of boats was such that many men found themselves unable to find berths on those which were still fit for sea, while at the same time the output of new boats was almost in abeyance, and the price of those which were being built was beyond the unaided means of the fishermen.’

The Board satisfied themselves these representations were well founded and after considering the matter in all its aspects came to the conclusion the position could best be met by organising a building programme and transferring the boats to fishermen for payment by instalments.

Negotiations were accordingly opened with the development commissioners with a view to obtaining funds to enable the scheme to be put into operation and eventually the board obtained an advance of £13,200 for that purpose.

This advancement was, however, subject to stipulations that the vessels to be provided should be built to a specification to be laid down by the board and that the machinery of Co-operative Fishery Societies should be used in transferring the boats to fishermen when completed.

Such societies were non-existent in Scotland so steps were therefore taken to draw up model rules for the guidance of fishermen and to organise the societies. For a time, the endeavours made to this end promised to be successful but, in the end, they proved abortive, the innate individualism of the Scottish fishermen proving too deeply rooted to be overcome by the arguments put forward in favour of the co-operative idea.