Walking football kicks off in Campbeltown

The players who attended one of the recent walking football sessions.
The players who attended one of the recent walking football sessions.

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It was a dark night in November 2019 when four excited players turned up to the Victoria Hall for the first session of walking football.

Numbers have gradually increased and at the last count there were 13 regulars, ranging in gender, age – early 40s to mid 70s – and ability – some played football, at varying levels, in their younger years and others are completely new to the game.

Initially introduced in 2012, walking football has become increasingly popular throughout the UK, with more than 100 clubs under the ‘Walking Football Scotland’ umbrella.

The game has many health benefits, helping to improve general/mental health and mobility, as well as the social aspects – the boost players get from smiling, laughing and sweating their way through a session cannot be underestimated.

Walking football is a small sided version of play where players are not permitted to run and, although this may sound straightforward, it can be surprising how hard it is to rein in the desire to get to that ball first.

Walking football is currently being held in the Victoria Hall, Campbeltown, on Wednesday evenings, from 7pm to 8pm. Each session costs £3.30 and can be booked through Live Argyll at the Aqualibrium.

For further information, visit the ‘Campbeltown Walking Football’ Facebook page, get in touch with Andrew Rathey by emailing  andrewrathey@btinternet.com or calling 07989 811132, or go along to one of the sessions and have a look.

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