Letter: Why can’t road signs be cleaned?

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The Courier asked: ‘Are dirty road signs dangerous? Here are a selection of comments from some of the paper’s Facebook correspondents:

Ken Banks: ‘Oo-er missus!’

Jimmy Coats: ‘Maybe they should try putting tar on the roads, that would be a lot safer.’

Andrew Rathey: ‘Forget about the dirty signs, what about the ones which have rusted right through and fallen over…bus stop at Stewarton is an example, by the no entry sign.’

David and Viv Perez Chavez: ‘The dirt makes em look vintage.’

Duggie Mitchell: ‘Clonaig crossroads, I cycled the 2.5 miles Skipness to Creggan Farm for the first three and a half years of my working life.

‘There were no dirty signs or potholes back then. Roads were much quieter too and no ferry to Arran either.’

John Richardson: ‘The guy in the comment further down (about a window cleaner in Nottingham who cleans signs with his power washer) has taken it upon himself to clean signs.

‘No doubt we can all do it but at the same time, we pay taxes, council tax, a higher rate of VAT. There’s even talk of tourist tax.

‘Why can’t the council clean the signs like they used to?

‘It’s not about prioritising between potholes and clean signs, it’s about maintaining services and providing those to the citizens.

‘It’s about assuring central government money is being spent correctly so that penalising cuts are not made. It’s about pride in the counties.

‘This is happening everywhere, not just Scotland, and it’s as if some bright spark has said: ‘Oooh, we save twenty grand a year not cleaning signs, let’s do that and make sure we have a really good stationery and a new photocopier in the council offices,’ and one by one they all copy.’