Man found guilty of abusing ex-partner

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A sheriff imposed a non-harassment order on a man who refused to leave the home of his ex-partner’s parents.

The man, who cannot be named for legal reasons was found guilty of behaving in a threatening or abusive manner at a Campbeltown’s sheriff court trial.

The court heard he shouted and acted in an aggressive, intimidating and erratic manner towards his former girlfriend, in front of their son, on August 11 last year.

Having failed to turn up at a previously-arranged meeting, the man appeared at the Kintyre house to see her and their son later that day.

According to his ex-girlfriend, who gave evidence as a witness, his behaviour in the beginning was normal, as he played with his son.

At some point, the man and woman began arguing.

Things calmed down and the man began playing with his son again.

The man asked if he could take his son out on his own.

When the woman said no, the man threw a ‘hissy fit’ and said he could do what he wanted.

The woman said there was ‘a lot of shouting and screaming’ before she asked him to leave.

He didn’t leave and instead laughed, and when the woman said she was going to phone the police, asked: ‘What are they going to do?’

The woman said her son appeared to be upset and confused.

She said: ‘I felt extremely scared because he was right up in my face, screaming, and I knew he was stronger than me.’

The woman said that she asked him to leave at least five times.

The woman’s mother came into the room when she heard the argument and also asked the man to leave.

When he refused again, the police were called.

Officers arrived 20 minutes later, and took the man to Lochgilphead police office.

In addition to the non-harassment order Sheriff Patrick Hughes deferred sentence for six months for the man to be of good behaviour.