The Post – if its known it’s not news

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A preview of CPH’s latest film The Post opening today

News is what somebody somewhere wants to suppress; all the rest is advertising.

Press baron Lord Northcliffe made this statement and it is the meat of Steven Spielberg’s edgy 1970s set thriller, The Post, opening at Campbeltown Picture House today.

In June 1971 The New York Times, the Washington Post and the nation’s major newspapers took a brave stand for freedom of speech and reported on the Pentagon Papers, the massive cover-up of government secrets that spanned four decades and four US presidents.

It is said that the film has a lesson to teach Donald Trump. Meryl Streep, 68, starring as the Washington Post’s Katherine Graham, America’s first female newspaper publisher, says she hopes it teaches him ‘about patriotism.’

At the time, the Post’s publisher was still finding her footing and Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks), the paper’s volatile, driven editor, was trying to enhance the stature of the struggling, local paper.

Together, the two formed an unlikely team, as they were forced to come together and make the bold decision to support The New York Times and fight the Nixon Administration’s unprecedented attempt to restrict the first amendment.

The screenplay for The Post comes from Josh Singer, who received the Academy Award for Spotlight, and music is written by Spielberg’s long-time collaborator John Williams. T

The Post also stars Sarah Paulson, Bob Odenkirk, Tracy Letts, Bradley Whitford, Bruce Greenwood, Matthew Rhys and Alison Brie.

A still from The Post newsroom. NO_c04cphpreview01_ThePost_Image